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Oly Freakdown Fest

Northern - Olympia All Ages Project - Sat, 10/25/2014 - 11:00am

Friday and Saturday, October 24th & 25th

Evergreen Noise, FLY, Bones Cvlt, OPP and OCS presents..

OLY FREAKDOWN FEST 2014
Olympia’s own loud rock costume party!

BANDS:
Motion (Tour Homecoming!)
Vessels (Tour Homecoming!)
Believer
Bréag Naofa
A God or an Other
Toarn
Countless The Dead
For the Likes of You
Lo’ There Do I See My Brother
Mi Amore Cadenza
The Lion in Winter
Thistopia
Redeem the Exile
The Further
A Friend
Brightside
Sorrow’s Edge
Heathen Washington
Gunslinger

MORE TO BE ANNOUNCED

Buy tickets at:
http://olyfreakdown14.brownpapertickets.com/
PRESALE ONLY: $12 Two Day Pass
DAY OF EVENT: $8 Per Day

When:
October 24th and 25th, 2014
Shows start each day at 2PM!

We are accepting band submissions for consideration. Please contact Joey Cristina joey@ourcityshows.com

www.olyfreakdown.com

Facebook Invite

olyfreakdownfest

Categories: Arts & Entertainment

Oly Freakdown Fest

Northern - Olympia All Ages Project - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 11:00am

Friday and Saturday, October 24th & 25th

Evergreen Noise, FLY, Bones Cvlt, OPP and OCS presents..

OLY FREAKDOWN FEST 2014
Olympia’s own loud rock costume party!

BANDS:
Motion (Tour Homecoming!)
Vessels (Tour Homecoming!)
Believer
Bréag Naofa
A God or an Other
Toarn
Countless The Dead
For the Likes of You
Lo’ There Do I See My Brother
Mi Amore Cadenza
The Lion in Winter
Thistopia
Redeem the Exile
The Further
A Friend
Brightside
Sorrow’s Edge
Heathen Washington
Gunslinger

MORE TO BE ANNOUNCED

Buy tickets at:
http://olyfreakdown14.brownpapertickets.com/
PRESALE ONLY: $12 Two Day Pass
DAY OF EVENT: $8 Per Day

When:
October 24th and 25th, 2014
Shows start each day at 2PM!

We are accepting band submissions for consideration. Please contact Joey Cristina joey@ourcityshows.com

www.olyfreakdown.com

Facebook Invite

olyfreakdownfest

Categories: Arts & Entertainment

Eric Ayotte and the Gadabout Film Festival

Northern - Olympia All Ages Project - Thu, 09/25/2014 - 5:00pm

Thursday, September 25th, 8pm

Eric Ayotte and The Gadabout Film Festival will be touring together this fall for 3 months going to over 75 cities in the US before continuing to Europe for shows in 15 other countries. Presenting a special evening of music and film in each town for one night only.

The Gadabout Film Festival has had a long standing tradition of DIY ethics matched with really cool filmmaking. Since 2002, the Gadabout has been touring with a new batch of films each year, brining film to non-film settings, screening an extremely inspiring and talented program of short films. Growing out of a DIY music scene, the Gadabout seeks to prove that “Do It Yourself” doesn’t have to mean any lack of quality. With equipment and technology more accessible, filmmaking is a more attainable medium, and yet we typically consume it through very tiny screens with poor audio. So, not only is there a curated element, but there is also respect given to these fantastic short films as they are presented on a big screen with good sound!

Eric Ayotte has been touring and releasing music for over a decade. His sincere songs bring a political message as well as an emotional truth. Thistour will be supporting his 4th full length record “Transparency”, a full band album that explores the concept of honesty, and wanting more open communication from his community, government, friends, religions, and himself.

www.gadaboutfilmfest.com

www.iamericayotte.com

ericayotte.bandcamp.com

gadaboutfilmfest@gmail.com

Gadabout 2014 poster

Eric and Charlie promo 2

Luminaris STILL

Categories: Arts & Entertainment

National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) Film Tour

Northern - Olympia All Ages Project - Sat, 09/20/2014 - 3:00pm

Sunday, September 20th, Doors open at 6:15, show starts at 6:45

For one night only, the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) invites you to celebrate the wonder of the outdoors through film.

The first annual NOLS Exploration Film Tour features two and half hours of exciting short films based on themes of wonder, discovery, curiosity, and the timelessness of the wilderness experience. Share this community experience with fellow and aspiring outdoors people and walk away with sweet door prizes–including a chance to win a free NOLS course!*

Space is limited—reserve your FREE ticket now HERE:
http://explorationfilmtour.ticketleap.com/olympia/details

*Ticket and attendance at the event are required for eligibility to win the free NOLS course. A post-event survey form will be emailed to all ticketed attendees after the event. The completed survey finalizes entry to win the free NOLS course. One winner will be selected from total attendants of all NOLS Exploration Film Tour events. The winner will be notified via email and phone by November 30, 2014 and announced on the NOLS Facebook page.
*NOLS course will be 30 days or shorter. Course is not cash redeemable. Winner is responsible for $65 application fee and associated course equipment deposit. Winner is subject to NOLS admission policies and screening guidelines. Course may be transferred by notifying NOLS.

NOLS

Categories: Arts & Entertainment

Couple Celebrate 40th Anniversary With Redesigned Wedding Ring From Hartley Jewelers

Thurston Talk - Sat, 09/20/2014 - 7:35am

ThurstonTalk

 

Submitted by Hartley Jewelers

Peggy and Mike Miller on their wedding day over 40 years ago.

Peggy and Mike Miller on their wedding day over 40 years ago.

“My original wedding ring was just a solitaire,” says Peggy Miller, who recently celebrated her 40th wedding anniversary to husband Mike Miller. “We were only 19 years old and on a shoestring budget.”

Many years ago, Peggy went to a jeweler to see about having her ring redesigned. “I had a vision of what I wanted to do, but they told me it couldn’t be done.”

Miller tucked the idea away and nearly forgot about it.

In recent years, Miller, who is the Director of the Miss Washington Scholarship Organization, worked closely with Hartley Jewelers to create custom rings for pageant winners and supporters.

“Having worked with them on those projects, I knew they always want to make sure they do the right thing for you,” she says, “and to help create what you’re looking for.”

She broached the subject of her wedding ring with Rick Hartley, who quickly came up with ten different sketches of redesigned rings based on what Miller told him she would like to see.

“Rick is so good at seeing someone’s vision and understanding what they’re asking for,” Miller says.

Peggy and Mike Miller worked closely with Hartley Jewelers to transform Peggy's original wedding band into something special for their 40th Anniversary.

Peggy and Mike Miller worked closely with Hartley Jewelers to transform Peggy’s original wedding band into something special for their 40th Anniversary.

She then took the drawings home and showed them to her husband; they both picked the same favorite, and the process of creating a beautiful new one-of-a-kind wedding ring began.

The couples’ original wedding rings both had shafts of wheat incorporated into their designs, significant to Miller who spent time growing up on the wheat farms of her grandparents, aunts, and uncles in the Pullman area of Eastern Washington.

“I spent a lot of time over there as a kid, visiting relatives in the summer,” she says. “It’s like a second home to me.”

Miller’s new ring keeps that wheat motif but expands from one solitaire to a total of 15 sparkling diamonds.

“When my mother-in-law passed away, we inherited her anniversary band,” says Miller. “So all of those diamonds now frame the solitaire, and the additional gold is from that ring, as well.” Hartley Jewelers is often able to repurpose stones and gold from otherwise unused jewelry that may still have important sentimental value. It is an effective way of getting custom jewelry created at a lower cost.

The finished rink was everything Peggy and Mike Miller had hoped for.

The finished rink was everything Peggy and Mike Miller had hoped for.

Miller hoped to keep her original ring as part of the new design. If you turn the new piece over, you can still see the lines of the original band that holds the solitaire running underneath the added swoosh of diamonds swirled by new wheat shafts.

“The diamonds and wheat are laying on top of my original ring,” she says. “That was important to me, to keep that intact.”

Rick Hartley first made a wax mold of the new ring, which Miller instantly loved.

“It was a very easy process,” she says of the custom design. “I was made to feel very comfortable. They don’t ever rush you; they take their time, which I appreciate. They’re just the nicest people and so helpful.”

And seeing the finished ring – slipping it on her wedding finger for the first time?

“It was very emotional,” she says, smiling “It was everything I’d hoped it would be and more.”

 

Andrew Landers: Local Pastor Follows Call to Career in Music

Thurston Talk - Sat, 09/20/2014 - 7:25am

ThurstonTalk

 

By Gale Hemmann

volkswagenYou can say it is Andrew Landers’ calling to touch people through music. Whether it’s playing at a festival or beside a hospital bed, Landers is known for the joy and spiritual sustenance that his songs bring. An acoustic-guitar folk singer and songwriter, Landers is an accomplished musician. In fact, he has recently decided to pursue his passion for music full-time.

In addition to music, Landers is also a full-time pastor and a father of six kids. I caught up with the busy Olympia local to learn more about his music and his upcoming transition.

Andrew Landers: Soul-Stirring Songs for the Real World  

andrew landers

After two decades of combining music and the ministry, Andrew Landers is going after a career in music full-time.

Landers’ music and life are rooted in a deep Christian faith. He has been active in the ministry for over twenty years. He has been a popular pastor at Evergreen Christian Church in Olympia, where he currently serves as Creative Arts Pastor.

He currently plays with the band Andrew Landers and Mainstreet Struggleville. He has released eight albums, and his music has been heard internationally. His band has played many shows and festivals, including at the Seattle Hard Rock Café, to name just one well-known spot. You can view videos of their performances on his YouTube channel and learn more about his music on his ReverbNation page.

Landers identifies his work as American Roots acoustic folk. Listening to one of his original songs, such as “Circle K Song” or the eponymous “Mainstreet Struggleville,” one can clearly hear the simple, emotional resonance that draws people in. I could hear echoes of Landers’ influences David Wilcox, Dave Matthews, and the legendary Johnny Cash. He says the back-up band has a rotating line-up, pulling from a pool of talented musician friends depending on the type of song he’s recording.

Andrew and his wife, Melinda, are also the proud parents of six children (including twins adopted from Sierra Leone). The family moved here from Portland four years ago, and they absolutely love the area. Landers says he likes the town’s laid-back vibe and the way so many locals care about issues that are important to him: this seems a perfect fit for his music and spirit. You can find the family driving around Olympia in Andrew’s beloved 1972 Volkswagen bus.

Landers also plays in musical therapy programs at hospitals and at senior homes. He tells me he especially likes playing for the elderly. “They are at such a powerful point in their life narrative, and it is so great to be able to spend time with them and listen to their stories,” he says. Fans say he has an immensely positive and calming effect on patients. As the Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu says, “Music in the soul can be heard throughout the universe.”

Answering the Call of the Music

andrew landers

Landers cites his children as an inspiration in his decision to pursue his dream full-time.

For many years, Landers’ career and music have existed side-by-side. Now, with the support of his family and all those who know him, Landers is embarking on pursuing his musical dreams full-tilt. He is planning to leave his full-time position at the church to focus solely on his musical career.

The way he and his family are making this transition happen is through a Kickstarter campaign. They are asking family, friends and community members who have been touched by Landers’ music to consider contributing to helping Landers realize his dream. The funds are earmarked for equipment and business costs for Andrew, and will enable his family to stay in their rental home in Olympia while Andrew travels. The one-year time window funded by the campaign would allow Andrew to get a focused start on his career, and the family is grateful for the support they’ve received so far.

Landers’ work wins raves from both critics and his fan base. The best way to get a sense of its power is to listen to a few songs. There is a presence, a core, in his music that will touch nearly every listener. And he is known for putting on a heartfelt live show. As Rick Palmer, a theater executive, notes, “From the moment the curtain rises, you will encounter a night of music that is both healing and provoking. A masterful storyteller.”

andrew landers

Originally from Portland, the Landers family loves traversing Olympia in their 1972 VW bus.

People who know him say Landers has not just the skill to pull off this dream, but the character to do so as well. Dawn Kero, a ThurstonTalk reader, says of him, “Andrew Landers is one of a kind – very compassionate, loving, funny, and a devoted father.”

In fact, it is Landers’ kids that are part of his inspiration for this journey. He says he realized he wanted to teach them to follow their dreams and pursue what they are passionate about in life.

So how will Landers spend the year? Totally immersed in music, he says. He will be “knocking on every door,” building networking connections in the music industry, playing shows, and seeking as much music-related business as he can. After two decades of sharing his music with others, he will finally have the time to see how far he can go with it.

Landers notes he’s been developing in a niche in writing special songs for events and advertising jingles. As long as he’s writing music and supporting his family, Landers is happy. He says this year would “give him a runway.” Clearly, this talented musician is ready to run.

How You Can Support Mainstreet Struggleville

andrew landers

Landers hopes to bring his contemplative, soul-stirring musical style to even bigger audiences.

To learn more about Landers’ project, you can check out his Kickstarter page. On the page, you’ll find moving video by Andrew and Melinda about the project and their mutual belief in Andrew’s future potential as a musician.

In talking with Landers and listening to his lyrics, you can definitely hear the sound of something big. It brings to mind a quote by one of Landers’ muses, Dave Matthews: “Take what you can from your dreams, make them as real as anything.” With the support of his family and the community behind him, Andrew Landers is poised to do just that.

To learn more about Mainstreet Struggleville and find upcoming show dates, visit their website or follow them on Facebook. You can also follow Andrew Landers on Twitter at @msstruggleville.

 

Agatha Christie’s ‘And Then There Were None’ at Lakewood Playhouse

South Sound Arts - Fri, 09/19/2014 - 12:32pm



 Published in The News Tribune, Sept. 19, 2014
  CURTIS BEECH (Mr. Rogers) and JANE McKITTRICK (Mrs. Rogers) from Lakewood Playhouse's production of "Agatha Christie's AND THEN THERE WERE NONE"Agatha Christie’s “And Then There Were None” at Lakewood Playhouse is a classic whodunit adapted by Christie from her novel of the same name. A mysterious and never seen man, U.N. Owen invites nine guests to his island home. None of them know each other, and none know Mr. Owen, but they each have something in common that is soon revealed. Each one of them has killed someone or has been responsible for someone’s death through negligence, and they are told that they have been brought to the island in order to force atonement for their guilt.
In classic murder-mystery fashion, each of them is killed off, one-by-one, and it is evident that one of them is the killer. Suspicions grow and the guests begin to fear and to accuse one another as their back stories are revealed; and as their numbers dwindle due to deaths in ways that are reflected by the framed poem “Ten Little Soldiers” that hangs on the wall.
MATT GARRY (Lombard) and JULIE SEIBOLD (Vera) from Lakewood Playhouse's production of "Agatha Christie's AND THEN THERE WERE NONE"For example, the first stanza of the poem is Ten little soldiers went out to dine; one choked his little self and then there were nine,” and the first murder victim dies by choking.
Despite all the murder, it is not a dark or disturbing story. There is ample humor and a fascinating variety of characters, each with his or her unique personality quirks as nicely portrayed by the large ensemble cast. The fun in the show is getting to know these characters and trying to figure out who is going to be killed next and who the killer is.
MATT GARRY (Lombard), THOMAS COOPER PHIEL (Marston) and ERNEST HELLER (MacKenzie) from Lakewood Playhouse's production of "Agatha Christie's AND THEN THERE WERE NONE"But how can there be none left at the end as the poem says? Wouldn’t the killer have to survive? That is the clever twist at the end that I can’t give away. Interestingly, Christie devised two very different twist endings, one for the novel and a very different one for the stage show. Both are complex and inventive.
The set by scenic designer Art Fick is the simple but elegant front room of a country estate with four doors leading to the outside and to bedrooms and kitchens (many of the murders take place off stage; they are not gruesome). One drawback to the set is the plain curtain hanging behind the double doors. There should have been rocks or trees or some such indication on the out-of-doors island setting.The lighting by Kristen Zetterstrom nicely depicts the natural lighting of sun, darkness of night, interior lighting and candle light, and enhances the dramatic impact of the acting.
First time Lakewood Playhouse director Rick Hornor does a great job of placing and moving about 11 actors in difficult situations such as when a character is murdered in sight of the audience in such a way that no one sees the actual murder.
Best of all, the cast members do a great job of portraying each of these often eccentric characters in such a way that they do not appear to be acting, the one exception being Xander Layden as Sir Lawrence Wargrave. In Layden’s defense, Sir Lawrence is, in fact, playing a role.
Among the standout performers are, first and foremost, Michael Dresdner as William Blore, a police inspector who at first pretends to be a wealthy South African. Dresdner’s acting is the most natural and unaffected, and more than anyone else on stage he manages to enunciate clearly in a British accent.
Dresdner’s wife, Jane McKittrick, is also outstanding as the alcohol-loving maid, Mrs. Rogers. She is the funniest character in the play, and McKittrick portrays her in a most delightful way. To her great credit, this is only her fourth time on stage.
Another husband-and-wife acting team that stands out is the team of Christian Carvajal and Amanda Stevens as the nervous and guilt-ridden Dr. Armstrong and the uptight and puritanical Emily Brent. Her costume and hair style, by-the-way, add immensely to the enjoyment of her character – kudos to costume designer Alex Lewington.
For those who truly appreciate good acting, I encourage paying attention to what these actors do when they are in the background and others are speaking, most notably Carvajal and Ernest Heller as General Mackenzie.
The set-up in act one is necessarily slow to develop, but once they get going it is a roller coaster ride of one surprise after another.
WHEN: 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, through Oct. 12WHERE: Lakewood Playhouse, 5729 Lakewood Towne Center Blvd., LakewoodTICKETS: $25.00, $22.00 military, $21.00 seniors and $19.00 students/educators INFORMATION: 253-588-0042, www.lakewoodplayhouse.org
Categories: Arts & Entertainment

Olympia Weekend Event Calendar

Thurston Talk - Fri, 09/19/2014 - 7:28am

ThurstonTalk

 

Fall was truly in the air this week.  And although the official first day of the autumn season isn’t until Monday, September 22, I could feel it in the cool of the mornings and evenings.  This weekend, though, sees us returning to temperatures over 80 degrees.  My family will be squeezing every last moment of fun out of these final three days of summer and I hope yours will too. And, luckily, the calendar is still full of great things to do and see – check out the highlights below. To see everything that’s going on, visit our full events calendar or navigate to our outdoor activities section for tons of ideas on how to soak up that last bit of sun.

Submit an event for our calendar here.

ThurstonTalk aims to be your source for positive information and events happening in Olympia.  If you have a suggestion for a post, send us a note at submit@thurstontalk.com.  For more events and to learn what’s happening in Olympia and the surrounding area, click here.

 

YouthBuild: Building Skills and Strength in Thurston County Youth

Thurston Talk - Fri, 09/19/2014 - 6:44am

ThurstonTalk

 

By Barb Lally

greene realtySkipping class, dropping out, hanging out in the street. Low self-esteem, no positive personal vision, no one to help. It is a recipe for a dismal future for youth who have fallen through the cracks from lack of support and guidance in school and in life.

Change all that to earning a high school diploma, hands-on training in the construction trades, earning a paycheck and receiving guidance from dedicated mentors that encourages a youth’s best qualities.

youthbuild

YouthBuild Program Director Sarah Wilkins with participant Diamonique at her graduation.

It is a transformation that is possible with YouthBuild, a program that has made a difference for nearly 180 of Thurston County’s young people ages 17 to 20 since the program began here in 2009.

Community Youth Services of Thurston County partners locally with New Market Skills Center to run YouthBuild helping youth who haven’t made it in the traditional school system find purpose for their education as well as real-life training in the construction trades that helps develop their job skills

But even greater, the program builds in its students—those aging out of foster care, low-income youth or those with disabilities, youth offenders, children of an incarcerated parent or migrant youth—a greater capacity to believe in themselves.

“I am fueled by being an adult in YouthBuilders’ lives who tells them they can achieve anything and that someone does believe in their capabilities,” says Sarah Wilkins, the program director for the YouthBuild Program. “We help them change the things they tell themselves into positive, life-giving messages.”

Sarah’s staff of five others with two construction instructors, a program supervisor and two case workers are all inspired by a passion for their mission.

“It is beyond a paycheck for the staff,” says Sarah about her team. “It is about helping individuals reach their full potential.”

Diamonique in the Rough

youth build

Diamonique has landed her first job and received praise for her work ethic.

Diamonique was a street-involved youth in California who lost her mother at the age of 12 and became the caretaker for her younger brother. She and her brother moved often seeking a place where they could be taken care of. Unfortunately, the places she found were usually surrounded by bad neighborhoods where she got into her own trouble with the law trying to survive.

Eventually, Diamonique moved to Washington to be with extended family, but she did not do well in school, fighting regularly and often skipping class.

Diamonique’s probation officer connected her with YouthBuild and it transformed her life.

“Her old habits were hard to overcome,” says Wilkins. “But when faced with a tough choice, she chose to be honest and open, and started the YouthBuild program with a real commitment.”

Diamonique has since earned her high school diploma and just secured her first job, a full-time, permanent position at Target. She is already being praised at the local store for her immediate success in a company promotion.

When asked today about her vision for the future, she is quick to reply, “I want to train to be a juvenile counselor because I know what it takes to get real help and I want to do that for others.”

Andre Gets a New Vision

Instead of attending school, Andre would hang out with friends or find other things that actually interested him.

youthbuild

Andre excelled at Youthbuild’s construction work and now wants to start his own company.

Once in YouthBuild’s program he excelled at the construction work with an impeccable work ethic and he challenged himself to rethink everything he knew to be true, including his history as a student who didn’t go to school.

“Through YouthBuild, Andre realized that though he had never thought of himself as a person that could do big things, or even finish high school, he now believes he is capable and aspires to go to college, something he never thought was possible,” says Wilkins.

Today, Andre is successfully working in an apprenticeship program in the construction trades.

“YouthBuild helped me become a teachable problem solver who works well with others,” says Andre who is now saving his earnings to open his own construction company.

The Program

The program begins with Mental Toughness, an intensive three-week orientation including team building, basic construction lessons, and academic assessment—all to determine if the applicants are a fit for the program.

Once accepted in the program, YouthBuild students participate in a half day of academics, taught by New Market staff. The other half of the day is spent on construction projects. All of it helps them earn credits towards their high school diploma.

YouthBuild construction projects include helping local non-profits like South Puget Sound Habitat for Humanity and Homes First! remodel and build homes for low-income families, providing students with experience while making a difference in the community.

The second phase of the program is critical because it is a year of working with the students to help them implement all they have learned from the work accomplished in their first year.

“YouthBuild truly works because the students invest and make it work,” says Wilkins. “The program gives our students the opportunity to reclaim the power in their lives, not just temporarily in the YouthBuild program, but for a lifetime.”

For more information about YouthBuild, click here.

 

Debra Daniels Offers Insurance Advice When Moving to a New Home or Apartment

Thurston Talk - Fri, 09/19/2014 - 6:27am

ThurstonTalk

 

olympia insuranceLet’s face it, moving to a new home or apartment can be daunting.  No matter what the circumstances behind the transition, things get forgotten, overlooked, and left until the last minute.

The seasoned professionals at the Debra Daniels Insurance Agency are a wealth of information for times just like these.  One tip Debbie shared was simple: call your insurance agent.  While it’s not mandatory to do so ahead of time, she suggests reaching out 30 days before the actual move.  A few minutes on the phone can insure your homeowners or renters policy transitions smoothly from one onto the next.

New policy seekers are also able to get a free quote online and rental policies are usually only a few dollars a month.  By chatting in person or on the phone, the agent can ascertain the best possible policy to protect your residence, belongings, and peace of mind.  Should problems arise, as they often do, you can file a claim via their State Farm website as well.

With more than 20 years of experience, Debbie and her State Farm team are a tremendous source of knowledge.  As a life-long resident of Western Washington, she knows what to expect when you may not.  Office hours are from 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. but they’re willing to stay late with convenient after hours appointments as needed.

Moves are like Christmas; we make a list and check it twice – twice an hour, more often than not.  Give yourself a break and check something simple off your list by calling Debbie and her staff as soon as possible.

The Debbie Daniels Insurance Agency can be found at 8765 Tallon Lane NE, Lacey, two blocks pass Costco on Martin Way;  or by calling 360-493-8284.  Look for the most current tips, advice, and frequently asked questions on their Facebook page as well; you can never have too much good information!

 

Upcycle Style: Fashionable Fife

Olympia Dumpster Divers - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 5:54pm

The Diva of the Olympia Dumpster Divers, Ruby Re-Usable, and Darcy Anderson (Team Tinkertopia in Tacoma) presented a trash fashion show on 9/13/14, as part of the Valley Ballyhoo Performing Arts Show in Fife, WA.  This was a first time collaboration between Ms Re-Usable and Ms Darcy, but as Ruby (and Jacqueline Susann) likes to say, “Once Is Not Enough,” so we look forward to more of these events in the South Puget Sound region (and beyond) in the future!

Ruby wearing a bag from Mason County recycling that reads "Once Is Not Enough"

Ruby Re-Usable is wearing a bag from Shelton/Mason County Recycling that once held recyclables

Ruby was introduced to Trash Fashion through Robin Worley/Rayona Visqueen of Haute Trash; she has since participated as a designer in trash fashion shows such as Trash Fashion Futures, Icicle Arts Trash to Fash Runway & Awards Show, Trashion at the Indiana Welcome Center, and the Seattle RE Store’s 10th Trash Fashion Show, among others.  She really wanted to work with Ms Darcy after seeing her as a “Daffodil Princess” in the window of Tinkertopia (where she is co-proprietress), so when the Fife Arts Commission asked Ruby to participate in the Valley Ballyhoo, she invited Darcy to join her, and a Trashionista was born!  Darcy got her talented Tacoma friends to work with her on Team Tinkertopia, thus inspiring even more creative folks to discover their inner trashion designer.

Ms Darcy as a Daffodil Princess in the window of Tinkertopia

Ms Darcy as a Daffodil Princess in the window of Tinkertopia, wearing brown paper packaging trimmed with yellow plastic lids and yellow duct tape

Trash Fashion is meant to be an “edutainment” event, combining information about recycling and other environmental issues with art and humor to create a show that is both entertaining and educational.  We also aim to be inclusive and body-positive, utilizing our friends and local volunteers as models.  The Upcycle Style show in Fife was no exception: our models ranged in age from elementary school to fifty-something, and we wowed the crowd with some of our classic trash fashions, along with some exciting new creations.  This show was also a learning experience for Ruby … like, how the show must go on, even if the microphone and pedestal disappear right before you go on stage (yes, this happened), along with other stuff (don’t ask).  We regret that we did not have any professional photographers to document this show, but we do have some pics on Flickr HERE and a cell phone vid posted on YouTube HERE

Upcycle Style trashionistas backstage

some of the Upcycle Style trashionistas backstage

 

Categories: Arts & Entertainment

Olympia Family Theater Presents Busytown

Thurston Talk - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 2:43pm

ThurstonTalk

Submitted by Olympia Family Theater Produced with permission from Plays for Young Audiences.  Dinea de Photo

OFT’s Lowly puppet was designed and created by Jamie Jenson. Photo Credit: Dinea de Photo

Busytown is always buzzing with activity. Just like the beloved and busy books of Richard Scarry, Busytown the Musical gets at the question on everyone’s mind: “What do people do all day?”

That’s where Huckle Cat comes in—he’ll take us on a tour of his great neighborhood while Huckle’s best friend Lowly the Worm has his own adventure. Not over the river and through the woods but rather; to the post office, hospital, airport, aboard Captain Salty’s pirate-y ship, and on a railroad journey with the help of the audience and Train the Dog, until finally reaching Grandma’s house. This musical radiates with simple, silly joy while bringing to life the impossible physics and interspecies harmony of Richard Scarry’s world. In this bustling musical, your favorite Busytown characters will sing and dance the answer, as we follow Huckle the Cat and Lowly through the winding maze of bakers, farmers, grocers, police officers, fire fighters, cars and trucks and things that go, and so much more! The busyness starts September 26. This musical is recommended for 3 & up. Special Dates:
  • Thursday Oct. 2 at 7pm Thrifty Thursdays  (Pay What You Can Tickets available day of show at box office starting at 1pm, cash or check only)
  • Friday Oct. 3 from 5-9pm No Show! Fall Arts Walk Preview Party & Kid Disco
Single tickets are available from our website.  Full and Partial Season Subscriptions also available. Ticket Prices:
  • Adults: $19.00
  • Senior/Student/Military: $16.00
  • Kids (Under 12): $13.00

Capital’s Payton McGuin Leads By Actions and Encouraging Words

Thurston Talk - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 2:23pm

ThurstonTalk

 

By Gail Wood

little caesars logoPayton McGuin was surprised by the teammate’s compliment and didn’t know what to say.

Her teammate had called her an inspiration.

“I don’t really think of myself in that way,” said McGuin, a senior and team captain on Capital High School’s girls cross-country team. “I just feel like I’m on the team.”

She’s a modest leader. McGuin and Lauren Pierson, Capital’s top two returning runners off a team that placed second in state last year, are the Cougars team captains. With that title comes responsibility. They can’t just be self-absorbed, focused only on their times.

capital cross country

Capital High School senior, Payton McGuin, is called an inspiration by her teammates.

“They’re both amazing,” said Lauren Frasier, a sophomore at Capital who is turning out for cross country for the first time. “They really help. They’re always making sure we’re doing good and they’re always encouraging you.”

McGuin has reinvented herself as a runner since she first turned out for cross country as a sophomore. After growing up playing basketball, McGuin got her first taste of running her freshman year when she turned out for track.

“I ran sprints,” McGuin said.

On the advice of her coach, Kevin Wright, she ran a “distance” event – the 400 meters. Showing promise – she ran it in 62 seconds – she showed up at cross country practice that fall. And she discovered that running, which is usually punishment in other sports when you do something wrong, was actually fun.

“She’s not a super star in anything,” said Wright, who is also Capital’s girls cross country coach. “But she’s great in everything.”

Whether that’s in the classroom, where McGuin has a 3.7 GPA, or turning out for cross country or track, McGuin has a give-it-your-best-shot approach. That attitude is why McGuin knocked a minute off her time her sophomore year. And it’s why she’s grown into being Capital’s No. 2 runner this season. She was her team’s No. 5 runner last year on a team that placed third in state for the second year in a row.

capital cross country

Cross country runners from Capital High School and Olympia High School join together before the Capital Invite race this month.

“Last year, as a junior, you could see that she was way tougher,” Wright said. “Way stronger. Way more confident in herself.”

By her junior year, McGuin had made a startling discovery. She could finish a race keeping a fast pace.

But despite all her success, McGuin nearly didn’t turn out for cross country this season. That’s because her mother, Sheri, died of an illness in August at age 51. With some prodding by her coach and teammates, McGuin showed up for the first day of practice. She’s found being around friends, laughing and talking with them, working hard at a workout, pushing herself in practice, setting goals and trying to make it to state again to be good medicine.

“For me, at first it was a little hard for me to turn out,” McGuin said. “But it’s been really helpful. It helps a lot.”

McGuin’s heart, her hard work at practice, her encouraging words to teammates, are even more inspirational for her teammates under the circumstances.

While McGuin gets satisfaction from dropping her times, getting a personal best in a 3.2-mile race, it’s doesn’t trump the experience of being on a team.

“That’s the one thing I really like about the Capital team,” McGuin said. “Your own times are important, but in the big scheme of things it is nice to be able to encourage your team and have that team push you and be behind you.”

McGuin isn’t just the encourager. She’s also the encouraged.  “If you’re having a bad race, there’s going to be somebody on the course cheering for you,” she said.

capital cross country

Payton McGuin, wearing #4232, lines up at the starting line for the Capital Invite cross country race.

McGuin and Pierson are the veteran returners for the Cougars.  After finishing third last year at state as a team and after McGuin finished 25th, the expectations are big for this season as Capital has 18 runners returning and there are 40 turning out.

But McGuin isn’t getting caught up with this having to be her best ever season. She’s not obsessed with dropping her times, and she’s not fretting about great expectations.

“For me, this season is more about just enjoying it,” McGuin said. “I’m still going to try to do my best and get PRs. But for me it’s just making sure I have a good time.”

At the recent Capital Invite, which drew 38 schools and an all-time high of 1,500 runners, McGuin and her teammates were on target. The Capital girls had a number of top 10 finishers. In the girls freshman race, Sarah Paquet placed 10th with a time of 15:37, just behind Olympia’s Ariel Wilhite, who placed ninth in 15:33. Mountain View’s Savanna Craig won in 14:05.

In the girls senior race, Pierson finished fourth in 13:57, just 16 seconds out of first place. Henry Jackson’s Brooke Kingma won in 13:41. McGuin placed 11th with a time of 15:05.

On the boys side, North Thurston’s Peter Allegre had the area’s fastest time as he placed second in the junior race with a time of 11:58. Olympia’s Kyle Rapacz placed third in the boys senior race with a time of 12:11 and teammate Ben Parke was sixth in 12:24. North Thurston’s Tyler Reece was seventh in 12:27.

Northwest Christian’s Luke Schilter won the boys sophomore race in 12:03 and Tumwater’s Evan Groat finished fifth in 12:53.

 

Olympia’s Gingerbread Village coming to Downtown for the Holidays 2014

Thurston Talk - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 2:05pm

ThurstonTalk

 

Submitted by Mary Ann Thompson

gingerbread house photoBack by popular demand is the Gingerbread House Extravaganza.  In Cooperation with Olympia Downtown Association, Washington Center for the Performing Arts and SideWalk – the houses are back!

This year’s gingerbread cottages and castles will be on display at the newly renovated Washington Center for Performing Arts as part of the “Downtown for the Holidays” celebration on November 29 and 30.

Your visit to the Gingerbread Village this year will benefit SideWalk of Olympia.  SideWalk is a successful grassroots organization with a mission to end homelessness in Thurston County. The proceeds from this event will help 100 homeless adults find housing and the support needed to stay off the streets.

Have some fun by becoming a baker, contractor, and architect all at once.  You can even eat your mistakes! Register now to build a house.

You can sponsor a cottage or castle and feature your business as a prominent part of the village as well

Call Kelly Thompson at 360-402-9999  or email kt2oly@gmail.com to register and answer your questions.

Northwest Christian High School Announces Changes for the 2014-2015 School Year

Thurston Talk - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 1:49pm

ThurstonTalk

 

Submitted by Northwest Christian High School

NCHS Hall chatNorthwest Christian High School has had another successful start to the school year and staff and students alike are excited by the many changes for 2014-2015.  Highlighted below are some examples of the progressive, rigorous and in-depth educational advances happening at NCHS.

AP Courses and STEM: New Advanced Placement (AP) courses in biology, chemistry, math, and US history. We are planning more STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) related course work as well. Read an in-depth review of STEM offerings here.

Concurrent Credits Available: Did you know that NCHS offers classes that not only earn credits toward a student’s high school diploma, but also credits at Northwest Nazarene University? Your student could graduate from NCHS with a diploma and a transcript from NNU to apply to nearly any college they choose to attend.

College Scholarships: Beginning with the graduating Class of 2015, Northwest Nazarene University is offering a scholarship established at $5,000 per year for every year a student attends NCHS full time between grades 9 and 12. The student must also graduate from NCHS with a cumulative 3.0 GPA and be in good academic standing at the time of graduation.

Grand Canyon University: Northwest Christian students who are accepted to attend GCU will receive a $5,000 (on-campus housing) or $2,500 (off-campus housing) scholarship at GCU per year for each year of attendance at NCHS (students must also meet the eligibility requirements).
Both of these scholarships could save students up to $20,000 on college tuition over the course of four years.

Career Center: To equip our students to reach their God-given potential, NCHS is in the process of researching, developing, and implementing a Career Center that will help students NCHS COmputer studentsidentify their talents/calling and assist them to establish a career path. We will also work with them to strengthen ACT & SAT skills by offering training, support, and practice exams. Stay tuned for more information about our new innovative career center—especially in the area of financial planning and potential scholarships for college.

Robotics Club: Dr. Norm Neilsen is forming a new robotics club at NCHS. Dr. Nielsen taught robotics last year and is expanding his teaching to a new innovative robotics club this school year.

New Staff members: NCHS welcomes several new teachers this year. National board certified teacher Mrs. Michelle Whittaker joins regional science teacher of the year Dr. Norm Nielsen in our science department. Mrs. Whittaker is a published scientist with several years of successful teaching and industry experience.

Mr. Josh Burdick is teaching Bible and Public Speaking this year at NCHS. Mr. Burdick holds a Master’s degree in Theology and a Master’s degree in Strategic Communication from Liberty University in Virginia. Mrs. Lauren Hendrickson is teaching an array of subjects including English and Academic Proficiency. Mrs. Hendrickson earned her degree in English and History from Seattle Pacific University. Our new technology teacher Pam Summers is a graduate of Humboldt State University in Computer Science and spent over a decade in industry as a successful computer programmer and consultant.

You can learn more about Northwest Christian High School in Lacey at our website or feel free to call us at (360) 491-2966.


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