Local Food

Make Art That Sells-Part B Week 1

Erica's Garden - Mon, 03/16/2015 - 1:10pm

This is my finished piece from the first week of the Make Art That Sells course I am currently enrolled in. The theme was toy trains and winter holidays, and the market we were exploring was the paper market, which would be things like cards and the like.

I LOVED working on this, especially the train, which surprised me…so I am trying to remember to keep an open mind about subjects that on the surface don’t sound all that appealing. It was also an opportunity to experiment painting a shiny gold effect and overall I am quite pleased with the outcome.

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Proposed Board Agenda for 3/19!

Olympia Food Coop - Thu, 03/12/2015 - 9:23pm
Proposed Board Agenda for March 19, 2015 6:30-9:30 pmBoard meetings are held at the Co-op's downtown business office at 610 Columbia Street SW. Members are welcome to attend.Contact ofcboard (at) olympiafood.coop with questions.
Agenda Item Action TimeMinutes Agenda Review share 3 Announcements share 10 Mission Statement read 2 Commitments Review share 5 Member Comment listen 10 Membership to POS Upgrade Proposal Moving our old membership database onto our new POS system consent 20 New website update Let’s take a look at the almost-complete new Co-op website! explore 25 Advocacy Committee brainstorm What might a committee focusing on Co-op advocacy look like? discuss 20 Break
10 Report back from Organizational Health taskforce In which the committee brings a very first/rough draft of what this concept/process may entail discuss 20 Staff report
listen 10 Committee ReportsBoard committees include: Co-op Development, Finance, Personnel, Local, Standing Hiring, Member Relations, Expansion, Eco-Planning, and Board/Staff relation
share 20 Personnel Policy Update temporary change to current personnel policy due to vacated positions consent 10 Commitments listen 2 Meeting Evaluation
discuss 3                                                             Total Meeting Time:      2 hours 50 minutes
Executive Session (Bylaws, Section III, number 16): “Board meetings shall normally be open to the membership. The Board may close meetings at its discretion to discuss personnel matters, legal matters, or other items which require private discussion.”
Categories: Local Food Blogs

Repotting and Preparing

Erica's Garden - Wed, 03/04/2015 - 11:15am

My poor african violets finally got transferred in to some larger, brand-spankin’ new pots. A local store had pots on sale so I was able to give a bunch of my house plants new digs. I am finding that attractive, AFFORDABLE pots are really hard to come by, which seems strange. I guess next time I am IKEA I need to stock up.

I am all about weeding right now. This is the “kitchen garden” and the first bed I am going to be planting into is the long skinny one in between the raised beds and the pathway. It’ll be filled with things like spinach, lettuces and peas.

Here’s the horror that is currently what I am calling “the south garden.” This one used to be beautiful, but I got super lax on mulching, then it got ran over, and now holy cow the weeds. Looking back, I should have planted fruit trees here. We are also sort of, in a fantasy kind of way thinking we could put a tiny house in this space, so…I’m just trying to keep it under control. I am mainly going to be growing potatoes in these beds this year.

It doesn’t’ look so bad from this angle. Well…minus the hoses and crap lying around. I’m thinking a chicken coop would totally fit in this space. I’m like the only person I know that doesn’t have chickens. Urban Gardener fail!

I also got my growing closet sorted out and will be starting some celery, celeriac, leeks, onions and cabbages in the next few days.

And as far as projects go we bought ourselves a fancy compound miter saw for Christmas, and I have a window and extra lumber in the garage that is just screaming COLD FRAME! Yeah!

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Native Harvest and Black Sheep Creamery profiles

The Plum Palate - Wed, 02/25/2015 - 4:00pm
Back in late fall, I was lucky enough to spend a rainy day along the Humptulips River with Sonny Davis, owner and fish buyer for Native Harvest, a company that supplies salmon and other seafoods to restaurants in Seattle and Portland. Sonny was trained to fish as a young boy and has parlayed his skill […]
Categories: Local Food Blogs

There and back again

Erica's Garden - Tue, 02/24/2015 - 1:11pm

I just got back from spending some quality time with my best friend and her family in Richmond, Virginia. These photos were taken before a gigantic snow storm descended upon us and kept us locked inside the house for four days with two sick children. They are my people, I love them. But I am GLAD to be home!





I wish I could have spent more time exploring the area. So many beautiful old homes in like, a two block radius.

In other news, as per usual at this time of year, I am totally obsessed with the garden. I got my tree collards in the mail while I was gone, and I just ordered some jerusalem artichokes, and I’ve pretty much got all of my seeds. I’ll get my potato seed from my local urban farm center next month, and I think I’ll be all set.

I told myself this week that I would spend an hour each evening after I get home from work (if it’s not raining) preparing the garden beds by weeding. I ALWAYS forget this step when I am planning my weekend garden activities and what usually happens that I get outside and realized that I need to weed, which takes up most of my energy and time, and I poop out before I can get around to the real work. Tonight will be my first test, so I’ll let you know if I actually weeded or if I sat on my butt with a cocktail.

Categories: Local Food Blogs

WLFN Survey: Yakima Valley Farmers! Go Local!

Olympia Food Coop - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 7:55am


Hi folks,

We've been asked to participate in a survey by some local farmers to help them plan their crops and and their marketing.

It takes less than ten minutes and will provide great information for small independent Latino farmers in the Yakima Valley -- let's help them out!

The WLFN (Washington Latino Farmers Network), is a non-profit organization that is comprised of first-generation farmers in Yakima Valley, WA, who are exploring how they can build ongoing retail relationships with consumers in Western WA. This work is being funded by several grants from the USDA small farmers program. Click on the link to take the survey!

Thank You for your valuable input!


WLFN Survey Click Here





Categories: Local Food Blogs

Gardening

Erica's Garden - Mon, 02/09/2015 - 1:42pm


This is my super messy garden plan for this year for part of the yard.

I have gardening on the brain right now. I just watched this awesome show by Alys Fowler I found on YouTube about edible gardening and it’s got me really inspired. Now that the seed catalogs have arrived, I’ve gone through my stash and am starting to figure out what will go where. I am still surprised how hard gardening is. Not only the physical labor, but the timing, the soil, the pests, the weathe, crop rotation…so much goes into it. My grandparents and great grandparents were able to feed their families with produce from their garden and I would totally starve if I had to depend on what I grow. Each year I get a little better, and I am hoping this year will be the best yet!

I was searching around my computer looking for a planting list from year before last and I found some half-completed graphics I started a few years ago:


I actually like that succession plan, but I don’t know where that info or idea came from. I wish I would have taken better notes. It’s also a tiny bit confusing. I guess that’s the good thing about giving things time…you can come back to them with fresh eyes.

I am going to focus on companion planting this year, which I did year before last, but not so much last year and I noticed a difference in the health and beauty of the garden. I also have a lot more space to fill up that I’ve had in previous years which is another challenge.

The main concept I am having a hard time wrapping my brain around is crop rotation within a growing season. I understand that you don’t want to grow the same thing in the same spot year after year, but I am still new to the idea that lettuces sown in the spring are going to peter out in mid summer, and I need to have something ready to stick in their place, like cucumbers or squash. And whatever that thing I choose in stick in that spot needs to be a companion to the other things that are already there and still growing, like onions. It can get confusing. Add to that the idea of succession planting, which is planting things spaced out over the course of a few months so you don’t end up with a glut of food, but a steady supply. I have NEVER been able to master that. I think I am going to have to bring in the big guns and use a Google Calendar.

I think I have finally got it figured out. I hope!

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Hi there. Remember me?

Erica's Garden - Fri, 01/30/2015 - 11:31am

Hello?

Holy COW. What the heck have I been up to these last SEVEN months?

Meh. Not a whole lot. Mostly binge watching shows on Netflix.

But…it’s a new year and I told myself that I would be BETTER about blogging in 2015. And then I promptly forgot I said that and was sort of like…”Oh yeah…crap. I was gonna blog. Better get on that.”

So. I’ll just give you a few higlights to sum up the past half a year so we’re all on the same page:

I’m learning video stuffs at work now, which I am totally loving. Me…IN ACTION:

Attended the School House Craft conference last fall and got super inspired and met a bunch of great, talented people. It was inspiring and I am really hoping to start my own thing in 2015.

I’m doing the Make Art that Sells course, which started last fall and starts up again in the spring. I sorta sucked at it (in a good, learning sort of way) and I only managed to finished 2 out of 5 assignments (because I suck)…but I told myself I would TOTALLY DO BETTER NEXT TIME, which starts up again in March. So here’s one of the assignments I managed to actually complete, a children’s book cover:

And! The seed catalogs are arriving in the mail, which means it’s almost GARDEN TIME!

I think for now, since I am dipping my toe back into the blogging world, I am going to try to start with one post a week, which will be on Fridays. SO. Have a great weekend! See you next week!

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Co-op Expansion Survey

Olympia Food Coop - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 2:18pm
Dear Members and Customers,
The Olympia Food Co-op is conducting a survey that will be used in a market study for the expansion of the Eastside store. The market study is part of a feasibility study that will begin soon.
What’s a feasibility study?The feasibility study is designed to help us figure out if it makes sense to expand and remodel our Eastside store, based on the Co-op’s needs and resources. A few years back, the Co-op purchased the lot adjacent to the Eastside store. With the help of a consultant, the feasibility study will help us identify what we can build there and how we can remodel our existing building.
What’s a market study?In order to determine how the project can benefit the Co-op and its members, we need to understand the market in which operate. The market study will provide information about current and potential competition, trends in the natural food industry within our region, potential new customers/members, etc.
The SurveyThis survey is a preliminary step for the market study and we ask two questions: “What is your full address?” and “How much did you spend here today?” This information is to identify the area from which the co-op draws its customers, so it is not necessary to ask for your name.Thank you so much for being willing to participate in this survey. We will keep you informed along this process.

If you have questions or comments, feel free to contact the Expansion Committee at expansion@olympiafood.coop.



Cooperatively,
The Co-op Expansion Committee
Categories: Local Food Blogs

Board Update

Olympia Food Coop - Mon, 01/26/2015 - 10:50pm

The Board of Directors appointed two new directors last night at the first Board meeting of the year. Desdra Dawning and Eric Mapes will fill the two vacant seats on the 2015 Board. Joshua Simpson has resigned, and one candidate declined her position.


Categories: Local Food Blogs

Roasted Eggplant Ratatouille

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

I have a confession. I love to mess up a perfectly good recipe, on purpose. I adore any recipe writer who is detailed and precise about their explanations and measurements. It helps me figure out how far I can veer before crashing into disaster. Becoming a decent cook is similar to any skill in life. Once you learn the basics you can begin tweaking, fiddling and meddling until you find your pulse. Your mark. Your touch. Typically, I try to follow a recipe exactly as written on the first attempt. Any attempt after, however, is fair game. Even at first attempt, I am liable to cut diagonally instead of vertically. I might add a handful of chopped basil instead of measuring it out precisely to 1/4 cup. I want to stay within the confines of the recipe without letting it confine my spirit, my passion for food. I, more than most, can become so lost in perfectly executing the details that I completely forget to enjoy myself. The final product may look and taste perfect but it will lack heart, soul and passion.

I’m really trying to remind myself of this lesson, especially lately. I fear I have gotten into a spell of looking a life as far to precise and perfect. As a set of skills I must develop and execute to succeed. As though anything in life that is executed perfectly, without heart, ever inspires anyone, including me. Inspiration is a feeling you get when you see someone else showcase a part of themselves that comes from a deep spark within. Perfection has nothing to do with that spark. This recipe falls right into that opportunity. Originally taken from Molly Wizenbergs book “A Homemade Life”, it is dictated with precision. She tells you how much to use, how thinly to slice and which way to cut and shape each vegetable. It doesn’t really matter. Really. I chopped and seeded with abandon. I measured and guessed. I threw in a bit of curry powered, garam masala and nutmeg. It still tasted delicious. In fact, I got so wrapped up in the process that I completely forgot to take a final picture. I think, in spirit, that is best. Then you never know what it was “supposed to” look like. You will only know what you created, how it tasted on your tongue and the way it made you feel when you were creating and that is all you need to know.

Position rack in middle of oven and preheat to 400 degrees. Arrange eggplant rounds in single layer on rimmed baking sheet. Pour 2 Tbsp olive oil in small bowl and brush onto eggplant. Flip slices and brush second slices as well, taking care that each as a thin coating of oil. Bake for 30 minutes, flipping slices halfway through, until soft and lightly browned on each side. Remove from oven and cool. (You can do this step a day or two ahead and refrigerate)

Warm 2 Tbsp olive oil over medium-high heat in a Dutch oven or large, deep skillet. Add zucchini and cook, stirring occasionally, until golden and just tender, 10—12 minutes. Remove it from the pan, taking care to leave behind any excess oil and set aside. Reduce heat to medium and add onion. Add a bit of oil if pan is dry. Cook, stirring occasionally until softened, about 4-5 minutes. Add bell pepper and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until just tender, but now browned, about 6 minutes. Add tomatoes, salt, thyme, and bay leaf and stir to combine. Reduce the heat to low, over and cook for 5 minutes. Add eggplant, zucchini, stir to incorporate and cook until everything is very tender, 15-20 minutes more. Taste and adjust the seasonings as necessary. Discard bay leaf and stir in basil.

Serve hot, warm or room temperature, with additional salt for sprinkling. This dish is even better a day or two later, as the flavors get time to mesh.

1 lb eggplant, sliced crosswise into 1-inch-thick rounds
olive oil
1 lb zucchini, trimmed, halved, lengthwise and sliced in to 1/2-inch thick half-moons
1 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced
1 large red bell pepper, cored, seeded and chopped
4 large cloves garlic, thinly sliced
5 Roma tomatoes, seeded and chopped
3/4 teaspoon salt
3 sprigs fresh thyme
1 bay leaf
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh basil

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Apple Tarte Tatin

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

I will begin this post with a great deal of apologizing. It will be the kind, however, that is done by any good friend that has been gone for far too long. The kind of apology that occurs after I knock the door, you open and I thrust a delicious dessert, still warm from the oven; begging to be drenched in vanilla ice cream and consumed. That is the only way to apologize for such an unexplained absence. I am not only apologizing to you, my dear friend, but to Molly Wizenberg. Writer of “A Homemade Life”, creater of the blog “Orangette” and my current personal hero. I believe the next few posts will be a direct copy of every recipe from her book. I can’t help myself. In my defense, she really should not have written such beautiful stories and recipes to match. As with any good idea, I want to try everything she writes about because she makes it all sound not only incredible, but familiar.

Familiar in the way you feel about your best friends spaghetti sauce and the way it always fills your house with the smell of love, comfort and safety. Familiar in the way that your favorite cookie recipe automatically makes everything feel right, even if they whole day fell to pieces. I want to make every recipe in Molly’s book because I feel like I know her and thus know the food she makes. I not only want to taste it all, I want to feel the way she feels when she eats it. Powerful stuff. So forgive the next few posts as I lavish adoration and attention. She may or may not be my idol right now, but I’m sure it will be evident the former is true.

I hope, only hope, to find some way to convey that feeling to everyone here. I want you to try these recipes that I create, not only because they will feed your bellies but because they will nourish your soul. I want to become familiar with y’all. In that spirit, I’m going to make it clear that my absence has occurred due to a family move to Austin, Texas. We are simultaneously settled, settling and unsettled. I’ve been inspired and found a renewed energy around being in the kitchen. I can’t wait to share what I’ve been doing. Tonight, however, I start with Molly’s Tarte Tatin.

It doesn’t look glamorous, and isn’t even the very first thing I would choose if waiting in line at a local bakery. I would be the fool in the end. This is astounding. My husband likened it to “creme brulee but better”. It is really best warm and served with a simple vanilla ice cream. I landed on this recipe because Molly described it as “a housewife in stilettos” and “it doesn’t dally with small talk. It reaches for your leg under the table”. Who wouldn’t want to eat something that is described with such passion? I know I am first in line. In fact, bakeries should really start describing their pastries in a similar manner…I would love to see what they invent.

Molly recommends puff pastry and I bought what I thought was puff pastry but was called Filo Dough. I’m not sure if they are really the same thing but it worked just fine. I just skipped the step where she asks you to roll out the dough really thin. I actually think I put to little dough in the pastry and would just put all of it in next time. It was still heart stopping and phenomenal…I can’t imagine how much better it would taste with even more dough. I may have just fainted from elation while writing that last sentence.

I also made a choice to buy whatever crisp, sweet apples I could find and used whole wheat pastry dough. Small changes but it didn’t seem to alter the incredible complexity of taste…as long as butter and sugar is involved…you are typically set. Since I don’t want to completely steal Molly’s thunder, I am making you go to her original post for directions. It’s the least I can do for a woman who talks about food the way a person might talk about a lover.

Juice of 1 lemon
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
5-6 large Apples
6 Tbsp (3 ounces) unsalted butter
About 14 ounces puff pastry

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Cheesy Spinach Crackers

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

A friend of mine had posted a link to a recipe for home made goldfish crackers a few months ago. I tried the recipe and my son gobbled down the entire batch, along with an entire group of mom’s I meet with on Monday mornings. It was such an enormous hit I thought often about making them again. Just as I got up the motivation I saw another post by a food blogger I follow that made spinach crackers. Whoa. The two recipes began making love in my mind and made this little baby. It was born from a desire to make great crackers with even more nutritional punch. My first attempt was soggy and sticky. I added more flour and less water and got a winner.

Preheat oven to 400 F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper or a non-stick mat. Or just use 1 baking sheet and bake 2 separate batches like I did. In a large bowl, whisk together the dry ingredients (flour, sugar, salt, dill). With a pastry blender (or two forks), cut in the butter into the flour mixture until crumbly. In a blender, blend the water and spinach until smooth. Now pour this into the flour and butter mixture. Stir this mixture until it just comes together and then gently knead with hands until it forms a ball. Be sure not to over handle the dough.

Split the dough in half. On a non-stick mat or lightly floured surface, roll out one half of the dough very thin (1/16th inch). Cut with cookie cutters or with a pizza roller. Gently lift off with fingers and place on prepared sheet (no need to space far apart as they don’t spread). Repeat as necessary. Sprinkle with more salt (I used Herbamare and it tasted amazing!) Bake for 9-10 minutes, rotating pan half way through baking to ensure more even baking. Crackers should be lightly golden when ready. My crackers took 10 minutes, but watch closely after 8 minutes. Be careful because they burn quickly. Cool completely on baking sheet and serve immediately. Store leftovers in a glass container.

1 & 1/2 cups (5 oz) 100% whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tbsp sugar
1/4-1/2 tsp salt (I used 1/2 tsp), plus more for sprinkling
1 tsp dried dill weed (or other herbs/spices of choice)
6 Tbsp butter
1/4 cup water
1 cup fresh spinach (30 grams)
2 Cups Cheddar Cheese, grated

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Bake Sale for the Food Bank

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

I know at every post you read you deeply wish I would just show up on your door step with everything cooked and ready for your immediate consumption. I know your drool at every photo, short circuits your keyboard and you’ve bought 100 in the last two years I have been posting. I know you bookmark the recipes with every intention of trying them on some night when inspiration and energy consumes you, only to discover you end up falling asleep on the couch every night with a empty bowl of ice cream on the coffee table. Oh I know. I know because I do it to. I bookmark recipes from other blogs and tear out photos and inspiration from magazines and Pinterest. All the while wishing they would just materialize in front of me so I could eat it. Sometimes it is not the baking and cooking I enjoy so much. It is actually just the eating. I also know how excited I would be if some of my favorite bloggers were just happening to sell their baked goods. I would probably pee my pants due to complete elation if I knew I could buy these goods and the proceeds would go to benefit my local food bank. I just might have a heart attack if I could also meet these bloggers. Guess what? It’s happening. Jenni from The Plum Palate is putting together an incredible event to benefit the Olympia Food Bank. You should check out her write up for the full details but I can promise incredible food from eight local food bloggers at only 1$ per item. Seriously? You gotta do it. Oh and did I mention there will be a raffle to win gift certificates to some incredible local bakeries such as Bearded Lady, San Francisco Street Bakery, Blue Heron Bakery, 8 Arms Bakery, and Bonjour Cupcakes.

Both cash and food donations will be valid for tickets you can exchange for baked goods. And remember, the food bank accepts both perishable and non-perishable items. That means you can donate almost anything, from a package of pasta to a bunch of carrots. I will be there from 5-7 and I will be making the following:

Chocolate Chip Cookies

Seven Layer Cookies

Vegan Brownies

Peanut Butter Chocolate Pillows

Visit our Facebook event page. Come down. Enter a raffle. Donate and eat some food all for an incredible cause.

Friday, April 27 from 5-10
Located at Make Olympia street market at Arts Walk, 100 block of Columbia
All proceeds benefit the Olympia Food Bank
1$ or food donation for each baked good
Raffle with gift certificates from local bakeries

Bloggers that will be participating:

Christine Ciancetta

Fresh Scratch

Krista and Jess

Mocavore

Real Food NW

OlyEats

The Plum Palate

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Vegetable Lasagna

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

My son is at an age now where he can legitimately help out in the kitchen. The tasks must be simple and supervised but it is a fantasy fulfilled. When he was much younger my sister bought him a full chef kitchen kit. Even though he was no where near old enough to utilize the toys, I pulled them out and he used them as rattles and items to chew and drool upon. I still dream of the day he will pick the recipe and I will help him in his determination to make our family a meal. I’m far ahead of myself but these small moments prep me for a completion of that dream and fill my days with little moments of contented bliss and fulfillment as a human being.

There are days when I am multitasking a boiling pot, frying chicken and roasting vegetables that I wish he didn’t have such a keen fascination with what I was doing in the kitchen. On this particular day, however, I prepped the meal during his nap, excited for his participation once he woke up. I lined up all the ingredients and he stood on a chair and diligently placed one layer on top of another. The focus and concentration out of this kid at such a young age still astounds me. The meal was incredible and tasted even better with that special layer of dreams and fantasies fulfilled.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Make white sauce: Melt butter in a medium skillet over medium heat. Stir in flour with a wooden spoon and cook until mixture darkens slightly in color, about 2 minutes. Whisk in the milk and bring to a boil. Smash and peel garlic. Reduce the heat to maintain a gentle simmer and add the garlic. Cook, whisking occasionally, until thick (about the consistency of yogurt), about 20 minutes. Season with salt, cayenne and nutmeg.

Bring a large pot of cold water to a boil over high heat and salt generously. Add lasagna noodles to boiling water and cook until ardent. Drain, but do not rinse and lay each noodle out flat on a work surface.

Lightly grease a 9x13 baking dish with olive oil. Use hands to squeeze as much water as you can from the spinach (if frozen); set aside. Heat 2 Tbsp olive oil in large skillet over medium heat. Cook meat or mushrooms with spinach and 1/2 tsp salt. Cook until meat is no longer pink or mushrooms are softened, about 5 minutes. Tear basil leaves over the mixture and toss.

Cover bottom of the prepared baking dish with 3 of the noodles. Top with 1/4 cup grated cheese, 3/4 cup tomato sauce, 1/2 cup white sauce and 1/3 of the sausage/mushroom mixture. Season with black pepper.

Add another layer of 3 noodles. Repeat twice and dot the top layer of noodles with the remaining tomato sauce, white sauce and grated cheese, making sure to dot some tomato sauce around the edges so that the noodles don’t dry out. Bake, uncovered for 45 minutes or until hot and bubbly. Let lasagna stand for 10 minutes before serving.

This will freeze really well. After baking, let rest and freeze whole or in portions.

Adapted from “How to boil water. Life beyond takeout” by The Food Network

White Sauce
3 Tbsp unsalted butter
1/4 cup all purpose flour
4 cups milk
3 cloves garlic
1 tsp salt
pinch cayenne pepper
pinch freshly grated nutmeg

Lasagna
12 whole wheat lasagna noodles
10 oz fresh or frozen spinach (if frozen, thaw)
2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
12 oz ground beef or chopped mushrooms
1/2 tsp salt
2 handfuls lightly packed fresh basil leaves (optional)
1 1/4 cups freshly grated grana-style cheese such as Parmesan or Pecorino Romano
3 cups prepared tomato sauce at room temp
Freshly ground black pepper

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Apple Cake

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

Tis the season that the weather begins to tease and taunt. Currently, the sun is out and I’m donning shorts and sandals. Tomorrow I could be in three layers of clothing and shivering as the rain pelters my face. This brings me no delight. It’s downright frustrating. It’s like someone giving you the most amazing bite of food you have ever had in your life and as you beg for more they just smile and say, “You will get more at some point but I’m not gonna tell you when”. Begin meltdown and an adult tantrum. This cake, however, is the ideal tantrum tamer. It’s like and flakey with a touch of apples, which happen to be in season at the farmers market, leftover from last September. It is also dense enough to go with a warm cup of coffee as the rain smothers your windows and you glare at the clouds.

I would love to try this recipe with whole wheat pastry flour, less sugar and butter and some flax in place of one egg. For now, however, it was exactly what the doctor ordered. Sugar and all. The original recipe is from Honey and Jam. She is incredible. I love anything I have ever made from her blog. Simple. Authentic. Perfect. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

Preheat the oven to 350. Butter a 9 inch round baking pan.Whisk together flour, baking powder and salt together in a bowl.Cream the butter, sugar and lemon zest on medium-high speed for 3 to 5 minutes, until light and fluffy. Add the eggs one at a time, scraping down the sides of the bowl after each addition, then stir in vanilla.

Add the flour mixture all at once and mix on a low speed just until incorporated. Pour (more like spoon, it will be very thick) into the prepared pan.

Score the peeled side of the apples with the tines of a fork and arrange the apples atop the batter around the perimeter with 1 slice in the middle (I cut each large slice into 3-4 small slices)

Sprinkle with turbinado sugar and bake for 35-40 minutes, or until the cake is lightly golden and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Sometimes the batter around the apples looks slightly underdone, but don’t worry; it’s just the moisture from the apples.

1 cup all purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
1/2 cup unsalted butter
1/2 cup sugar
zest of 1 lemon
2 eggs
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
2 apples, peeled, cored, and each cut into 6 pieces
2 tablespoons of turbinado sugar

Categories: Local Food Blogs

“Uchiko” Roasted Brussel Sprouts with Thai Sweet Chili Sauce

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

Our family recently traveled to Austin. The reasons for travel were mostly business and SXSW related tomfoolery. It’s an amazing world. Really. Another world. It doesn’t even feel like a state that’s connected to the United States of America. It’s warm. All. The. Time. The people are unbelievably friendly and charming. They really live up to the stereotype of southern hospitality. It was a mecca for our family. It was a trip I enjoyed from the third day to the last. The first two days it rained. Hard. Everyone came outside to watch as though it were some bizarre anomaly like a comet dipping out of the sky on to the ground or a leprechaun really appearing at the end of the rainbow. I was, however, grumpy. I flew five hours with a toddler for more rain? No thanks.

Then on the third day the skies opened like a dark curtain on a stage and the sun made its grand entrance.We spent an unmentionable amount of time outdoors and consuming food, all with very close friends. This recipe is for a deeply good friend. He took us to a place called Uchiko. We waited almost an hour to get inside. I was ready to throw in the towel. My toddler was ready to throw everything. I was starting to get “hangry” a vicious combination of hungry and angry. I’m so glad I stayed. Each dish was an orgasm just waiting to happen inside my mouth. I believe I may have unintentionally reenacted the scene from “When Harry Met Sally”. You know the one. The first dish was roasted brussel sprouts in a thai chili sauce. My tongue wasn’t prepared for such an onslaught of amazingness. I vowed I would come home and replicate it and I think I did.

Cut brussel sprouts in quarters and place in 13x9 glass baking dish. Coat with olive oil, brown sugar, salt and pepper. Bake at 400 degrees for 40-50 minutes or until very soft and golden. Remove from oven and stir. Switch temperature on oven to a low broil. Broil for 5 minutes. It’s okay if it burns a bit on the edges….it supposed to give it extra crisp. Remove from oven and cover with sweet chili thai sauce. Consume happily. Chopsticks make it even more fun. The measurements for ingredients are not rigid. The recipe can easily be sized down for just one or increased for a party. Add more brown sugar if you want it sweeter or more spices if you enjoy that blow to the mouth.

2-3 lbs brussel sprouts
1 Tbsp brown sugar
1 Tbsp Olive oil
salt and pepper
Bottle of Sweet Chili Thai Sauce (found in most stores)

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Easy Granola Bars

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

I once wrote about my dear dislike for granola, the store bought kind, only to happily discover that it came alive when cooked at home. The belief that I knew what I did and did not like began to adjust itself. I realized that most anything I can make at home I really enjoy. Most anything. There are a few incidents that we never speak of and won’t dare mention here. I have also taken a stab at granola bars. While enjoyable, they are loaded with sugar and jam and don’t speak to that sweet and salty mix I really enjoy in the perfect snack.

A friend of mine shared that she was trying to decrease the amount of packaged and store bought goodies. Replacing them with as many home made versions as possible. This woman has two small children and a husband who is in the depths of his medical internship and thus rarely home. I admire her and was shocked she has the time to make anything. She insisted they were terribly easy so I requested the recipe. It really is incredibly easy and quick and delicious. When I hear those words combined, I usually do a somersault of glee and put it on the blog. In that order.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Combine ground flax seeds and water. Set aside. Combine oats, flour, baking powder, salt and sugar in mixing bowl. Stir in raisins and chocolate chips. In separate bowl, combine maple syrup and nut butter and mix until smooth. Combine nut butter mixture with flaxseed-water mixture.

Add wet mixture to dry and stir well. The mixture will seem dry, but keep stirring until fully integrated. Press mixture into 8x8 inch pan that has been sprayed with cooking spray. Bake for 15 minutes. Allow pan to cool slightly, then cut into bars and transfer to cooling rack.

Peas and Thank You Cookbook
3 Tbsp ground flax seeds
1/4 cup + 2 Tbsp water
2 cups old-fashioned oats
1/2 cup whole wheat pastry flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 cup organic sugar
1/2 cup raisins or other dried fruit
1/4 cup chocolate chips
1/3 cup maple syrup
1/2 cup nut butter of your choice

I also added about 1/4 cup coconut flakes.

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Saucy White Fish

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

I’ve thoroughly enjoyed blogging about food and telling stories about my personal life. It has, however, become a large obstacle in my desire to post at least twice a week. The thought of creating a story, theme and some clever words, leaves my butt cemented to the chair in protest. I believe it has to do with this wonderful change in life where I have very interesting, incredible and exciting things occurring every day. The thought of staring at a computer screen while my boy naps is always on the bottom of my list. It is not as though I haven’t been in the kitchen. Quite the contrast, I can seem to stay out of it. Even to sit down and write a little post about what exactly I am doing in that very kitchen. So today, I am going to share a recipe and commit to sharing at least two recipes a week.

The story may not be as clever, the pictures may not be as plentiful or in depth, yet I am sure that is not what has really mattered to anyone. What really matters is whether the food that comes out at the end is any good. Trust me, it is always good. The original recipe came from Olympia Seafood Company, a local seafood supplier. The woman actually just told me the bare bones while exchanging fish and money over the counter.

Set your oven for 380 degrees and line a baking dish with foil for easy clean-up later.  In a fry pan, sauté your onion, carrot, mushrooms and garlic in the olive oil until desired tenderness and set aside to cool for a few minutes.  Once it’s not blazing hot, stir the sour cream into the onion/garlic mixture.  Place the fish in the baking dish and pour the sour cream and onion mixture over the top, smoothing it out evenly.  Bake for about 18 minutes and then check for doneness. Enjoy!

1 pound fresh white fish, skinned (servings for 2-3)
salt
1 yellow or sweet onion, chopped
5-6 cloves garlic, diced
1 carrot, diced
4-5 oz mushrooms, diced
1T olive oil
¾ cup sour cream

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Inspired Quinoa Bean Soup

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

I was lavished with food and gifts a few weeks ago by some incredible friends in Seattle. My husband was in Africa on a retreat for his job. He claims he worked but I have yet to see a photo to substantiate this claim. There were many photos, however, of the beach, food that made me drool and shorts. Lets get back to me and my son and the snow storm that ensued while he was away. Just before the storm, my son and I stayed with these women who I love dearly and who love my son dearly and that makes me swoon all over them in a somewhat inappropriate manner. The meals they prepared were magazine worthy and one dish in particular made me go back for at least four bowls.

It was a soup made of quinoa, kale, potatoes and love. It sang gently of comfort and health, and was exactly what we needed while my husband was so far away. I was not able to obtain the recipe from my friend but decided to get creative one night and make something as close as possible to what we had eaten but using only my own personal knowledge and “expertise”. I have to say, I really hit it out of the ball park with this one. I made enough to give to a friend and she raved and demanded the recipe. I fluffed my chest out appropriately and informed her it was actually my very own recipe. I may have strut a bit when I walked later that day, maybe.

Saute onion and carrots in oil over medium heat until softened. Add garlic cook another 30 seconds.

Add broth and beans and bring to boil. Reduce to simmer, cover and cook 30 minutes.

Add potatoes and rutabaga, cover and cook another 30 minutes.


Return to boil. Add quinoa, spices and greens, reduce heat, cover and simmer another 15-20 minutes or until quinoa is soft. Remove from heat and serve with thick, hearty bread.

I also added a bit of leftover shredded chicken that was in our fridge. I think it was a wonderful addition but not at all necessary.

1-3 Tbsp oil (I used coconut)
2-3 carrots, diced
1 small onion, diced
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 cup dried beans (soaked for 8 hours or overnight)
2 cups vegetable broth or water
3 small potatoes, diced
1 rutabaga, diced
1 cup uncooked quinoa
1 bunch greens (kale, spinach, swiss chard), finely chopped
spices as desired *
salt and pepper to taste

* I used 1 tsp cumin, 1 tsp curry powder and 2 tsp thyme

Categories: Local Food Blogs
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