Local Food

Raise a Pint to Toast Three Magnets Brewing Company

Thurston Talk - Tue, 10/14/2014 - 6:38am

ThurstonTalk

 

By Lisa Herrick

Thurston First BankThe highly anticipated opening of Three Magnets Brewing Company will soon be here, although it is intended to be a quiet and understated event. The plan is to open with a soft launch by the end of October and unveil the brewery’s craft beers with a limited menu.  The full menu featuring a casual take on pub style goodies, which includes house-cured seafood, seasonally inspired cocktails and regional wines, will slowly be rolled out in the following months.

three magnets brewing

The Three Magnets Brewing Company team inside the nearly completed brewpub. Tanks are full of ready to serve craft beer. Left to right: Nate, Sara and Elliot Reilly-Three Magnets Brewing Company owners, Jeff Stokes-Brewer/Front of House Manager, Nancy Bickell-Kitchen Manager, and Pat Jansen-Head Brewer/Local Sourcing Liaison.

This gradual introduction of the locally sourced and made from scratch menu is an intentional decision to ease the 40 new employees and thereby the community into a successful experience with the new brewpub. I recently toured the brewery with the Three Magnets Brewing Company gang. I suspect my experience is precisely the vibe they are striving for – the sharing of quality beer with lively discussions in a family friendly setting. I could engage in conversation and drink beer with them any day.

“What we have been hearing is how excited people are to have the brewpub in Olympia and how thrilled they are that they can bring their kids to a public house,” share Sara and Nate Reilly, owners of Three Magnets Brewing Company.  You may recognize the couple as the owners of Darby’s Cafe also located in downtown Olympia. The Reillys aspire to honor Olympia’s brewing history while creating a community gathering space. “People want to be associated with beer in this area because it is a key part of our heritage,” Sara explains.

The Reillys have designed the brewpub to include an all-ages dining area, an open kitchen for customers to view their meals being made from scratch, an open brew space where beer will be served directly from the tanks, and a 21+ pub offering indoor and outdoor seating. While the brewpub’s layout is integral to the community gathering space design, the Three Magnets Brewing Company name creates the ambiance.

“Three Magnets is based on a 115-year-old book called Garden Cities of To-morrow by Ebenezer Howard,” explains Sara.  ”Basically, Ebenezer considered himself an inventor of the perfect community. He thought he could take the best of both rural and urban living and blend them into a perfect town-country. When reading this, everything called out to us as Olympia, either what we are or what we strive to be.”

three magnets brewing

Brewer Jeff Stokes serves up beer sampling directly from the tank.

“We don’t know if we are there yet but it is where we want to be and it is what we want to do as a business to help the community get there,” agree Nate and Sara.

Nate continues, “The community support has been awesome. So many businesses have reached out to put our beer on tap, help us move our tanks or welcome us to the neighborhood. They truly want us to be successful.”

The Reillys consider success as a thriving business that gives back to the community.

Three Magnets Brewing Company has named their flagship beers after some other local icons.  Proceeds will benefit local causes within the community. Nate explains, “We currently have three namesake beers reflecting some of our favorite places in the community – The Brotherhood Brown named after the Brotherhood Lounge, Rainy Day IPA named after Rainy Day Records, and the Helsing Junction Farmhouse Saison named after Helsing Junction Farms. Early next year we hope to introduce the Oldschool Lager to be named after Oldschool Pizzeria.”

“The plan is to donate a designated amount from each pint of these beer sold to a cause mutually decided between us and the namesake business,” Nate continues. “For example, $.25 of every pint of the Brotherhood Brown sold at Three Magnets Brewing Company will go toward SafePlace, an important cause to Brotherhood Tavern owners Pit and Melissa. They are also doubling-down on this and will be donating $.25 of every pint that they sell of the Broho Brown over their bar to SafePlace as well.” Three Magnets Brewing Company will soon be announcing the charitable causes for the Rainy Day IPA and Helsing Junction Farmhouse Saison.

three magnets brewing

Three Magnets Brewing Company is an all ages brewpub serving craft beer and casual take on surf-n-turf. Photo credit: Three Magnets Brewing Company

In addition to the namesake beers, the brewery tanks are full and ready to serve Session IPA, Session Saison, Brewers Best Bitter and Rye Ale.  A Fall Harvest brew is in the fermentation tank and ready to be moved over while two fresh hopped IPAs are fermenting away.  Each of these beers will be available once the doors open. Until then, you can fill your growler at Gravity Beer Market or find their beer on tap at The Brotherhood Lounge, The Old School Pizzeria, Cooper Point Public House, Farrelli’s Wood Fire Pizza, Dillinger’s Cocktails and Kitchen, Darby’s Café, i.talia Pizzeria, Mercato Ristorante, Ramblin’ Jacks, Rhythm & Rye, Skep & Skein, Vic’s Pizzerias, The Westside Tavern, Waterstreet Café & Bar, and The Eastside Club Tavern.

Here’s to toasting the innovative brews, delectable menu, and the pursuit to create the ideal community. To stay informed of the Three Magnets Brewing Company progress visit their Facebook page.

Three Magnets Brewing Company

600 Franklin Street SE, Suite 105

Olympia, WA 98501

 

Categories: Local Food Blogs

A crisp and its maker : sponsored post

The Plum Palate - Fri, 09/26/2014 - 8:57am
Thank you to Lesley Stowe Fine Foods for sponsoring this post. This week, I started thinking about cheese plates for a crowd. Which is appropriate after meeting Lesley Stowe last weekend and hearing about her history in the food business. Over drinks at the Westin hotel in Seattle, Lesley told a number of food bloggers […]
Categories: Local Food Blogs

Fruit plate for one (+ one) : sponsored post

The Plum Palate - Tue, 09/16/2014 - 2:33pm
Thank you to Lesley Stowe Fine Foods for sponsoring this post. My mom put that first meal in front of me, not an hour after we first brought our daughter home. She knew what to do in that blissed-out moment, when I was so distracted by my girl’s crumpled baby skin and endless, shifting micro-expressions […]
Categories: Local Food Blogs

My Edible Seattle stories + it’s time for IFBC again !

The Plum Palate - Fri, 09/12/2014 - 3:17pm
Over Labor Day weekend we went camping with friends and the highlight had to be the second waterfall we hiked in to see. The water rushed down just beyond a curving hunk of rock that jutted up from the pool. As we waded and found good skipping rocks and squinted down at a tiny toad, […]
Categories: Local Food Blogs

World’s Best Food Blogger Talks about Her Latest Book

Thurston Talk - Mon, 09/01/2014 - 8:56pm

ThurstonTalk

Submitted by The Timberland Regional Library

wizenberg, molly09Writer Molly Wizenberg, whose blog “Orangette” was named the best food blog in the world by the London Times, will talk about her latest book, “Delancey,” Thursday, September 18 from 7:30 to 8:45 p.m. at the Olympia Timberland Library.

The publisher’s synopsis sets the scene: “When Molly Wizenberg married Brandon Pettit, he was a trained saxophonist and composer with a handful of offbeat interests: espresso machines, violin construction, boat building, and ice cream making, to name a few. So when Brandon decided to open a pizza restaurant, Molly was supportive – not because she wanted him to do it, but because the idea was so far-fetched that she didn’t think he actually would. But before she knew it, he’d signed a lease.”

Wizenberg’s first book, “A Homemade Life: Stories and Recipes from My Kitchen Table,” was a New York Times bestseller. Her work has appeared in Bon Appétit and the Washington Post.

All programs at Timberland Regional Libraries are free and open to the public.

The Olympia Timberland Library is located at 313 8th Avenue SE. For information, contact the library at (360) 352-0595 or visit www.TRL.org.

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Dillingers: How a Prohibition-Era Bar is Breathing New Life into Olympia’s Security Building

Thurston Talk - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 6:39am

ThurstonTalk

 

By Kelli Samson

greene realtyWhat does John Dillinger, the notorious gangster of the Prohibition Era and the Great Depression, have in common with Olympia? We have to go way back, so stay with me on this one.

olympia history

Walter Chambers and Joseph Swanton had such a successful butcher shop in Lacey that they had to move to a much bigger location on the site where the Security Building now sits. (Image courtesy of the Washington State Historical Society)

John Dillinger was the reason J. Edgar Hoover formed the FBI. The government needed a way to start cracking down on organized crime in the 1930s, and Dillinger’s gang was the biggest thorn in their sides. He was responsible for two-dozen bank robberies, four police station robberies, and the homicide of one police officer. He was known to be wild and proud of his crimes. Dillinger died in a shoot-out with police in 1934.

Dillinger got his start in the world of crime in the 1920s, a time known as the Prohibition Era – think “The Great Gatsby.” It was a time of flapper girls and secret bars (speakeasies) where alcohol was served illegally.

Dillingers Cocktails and Kitchen, located at 404 South Washington in downtown Olympia, is housed in the old Security Bank Building, which was built in 1927.

The building is on the corner of Washington and Fourth Avenue and was so tall in comparison to the other buildings at the time, people referred to it as a skyscraper. It’s a whopping five stories tall. Prior to the Security Building’s construction, the corner was home to Chambers and Swanton Meat Market, a full-service butcher.

olympia bar dillingers

The Security Building sits on over 300 pilings over filled-in tidal marsh.

The building’s designer was Abraham H. Albertson, an architect from Seattle who primarily designed buildings for the University of Washington and who also designed Cornish College of the Arts.

The Olympia-based construction company known as the Dawley Brothers, which was owned by Leo and J.M. Dawley, constructed the structure. They also built the Hart-Dawley house in the South Capital neighborhood, which was the home of Governor Louis Hart.

The Security Building was built in the Sullivan-esque Style (think rosettes and pineapple details) and boasts nothing but the finest materials available at the time. There is marble from Europe and granite from Canada, not to mention prized mahogany from the Philippines throughout. The structure has remained sound all these years later, even though it’s built on fill over the natural location of tidal marshes, it rests on hundreds of pilings, and it has weathered two major earthquakes.

olympia bar dillingers

The ladies behind Dillingers’ success: (from left) Sandy Hall, Lela Cross, Denise Alonso, and Sherilyn Lightner.

The style of the building certainly makes an establishment like Dillingers seem like it truly belongs there.

Dillingers is owned by Lela Cross (of the former culinary gems Capitale and Cielo Blu), Denise Alonso (who formerly ran the bakery at Saint Martin’s University), and Sandy Hall (formerly of Batdorf and Bronson). “There’s nothing that compares to the fun, the vibe, or the stress of owning a restaurant,” says Hall.

Dillingers is full of swank. There are bold chandeliers and dark walls with custom-made wallpaper in places. There is a gorgeous bar, designed by Hall, that’s high on gloss. Everything is plush and fancy.

After leasing the space, Hall’s father took one look at the original teller’s booth and into the old bank vault in the back and declared that it brought to mind the days of John Dillinger. Thus, downtown Olympia’s melting pot of hipsters, legislators, and all kinds of people in between was given its name.

“The customers send us things about Dillinger all the time,” says Cross.

The old bank vault and the name helped shape and guide the vision Alonso, Cross, and Hall had for the establishment that opened this past winter. In a building with 1920’s architecture and a name harkening back to the time of bank robberies, and gin joints, there was only one direction to go: Prohibition Era cocktails.

The Prohibition Era is known more for cocktails than food, so the owners were free to bring in their own favorites when it came to planning a menu. The seafood is a nod to Olympia (and supplied by Olympia Seafood Company), while dishes like red beans and rice are reminiscent of Houston, from which Hall originates. Cross is from New Mexico, and she likes colorful foods. Hot Babe Hot Sauce is sourced from Sandra Bocas in Yelm.

olympia bar dillingers

The Security Bank Vault is Dillingers most-requested area for reservations.

The real star on the menu, though, is the whiskey bread pudding. Why? Well, there’s no bread in it, for starters. Instead, you’ll find doughnuts to be the secret ingredient in Alonso’s brilliant “creation that everyone loves.”

The authentically-crafted cocktail menu is divided by the darlings of the Prohibition Era: whiskey, cognac, gin, rum, tequila, champagne, wine, beer, and hard cider. Dillingers uses spirits from local distilleries and breweries. You can, of course, order whatever kind of cocktail you want. But why would you do that when you can put yourself in the hands of these master cocktail craftspeople and drink something called a Mary Pickford, named after America’s first sweetheart of film, instead?

“We have probably the best bartenders in town,” smiles Cross. “They have such a passion for what they’re doing.”

The bar manager is Sherilyn Lightner. She has researched the cocktails of the era by reading old cocktail books. If you’re unsure of what to order, here are the favorites from the insiders themselves:

  • Vieux Carre’: Lightner affectionately refers to this as “The Manhattan’s richer, more-sophisticated uncle.”
  • French 75: Alonso enjoys that this is “pretty fresh and simple.”
  • Blood and Sand: Cross loves this bright nod to the Rudolph Valentino film of the same name.
  • Viejo Verde: Hall describes this as a “smoky margarita.”
olympia bar dillingers

Many of Dillingers spirits are sourced from local distilleries such as Wishkah River in Aberdeen.

Next up for Dillingers is their “Gin Punch Brunch,” which premieres September 14. They also have an artist-of-the-month. Pairing up with the community is clearly important to Dillingers.

Meanwhile, the ladies of Dillingers will continue to enjoy the little moments that make it special for them. For Cross, this happens every night. “I stand out on the sidewalk and I wait for someone to open the door to go in so I can hear the roar of the happy crowd inside.”

Adds Alonso, “I work in the kitchen, which is between the vault and the bar. I love how people stop by and introduce themselves.”

“I really love the way people come together here. They end up making friends or running into people they haven’t seen in years,” shares Hall.

While it’s true that John Dillinger never set foot in Olympia, it is also true that you are not John Dillinger. Lucky for you (for lots of reasons), because that means you can enjoy Dillingers Cocktails and Kitchen – perhaps even tonight.

You can learn more about Dillingers by visiting their Facebook page or their website.

 

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Olympia Food Co-op Harvest Party

Olympia Food Coop - Wed, 08/20/2014 - 10:51am
Announcing the Olympia Food Co-op's 10th Annual Harvest Party and Local Eats event!  

Celebrate the bounty of the harvest and our local producers, bring a potluck item to share, take part in our First Annual Zuch Fest!  Do you have a zucchini in your garden that got a little out of control?  Bring it to our giant zucchini contest!  Roll it in the zucchini derby, or bake your favorite zuch-creation for the zucchini bake-off!  Details for each are below.
This year, we'll be hosting the Harvest Party at our newly remodeled, warm and welcoming Westside location --  come see our fresh new look!  Check out the new expanded Wellness department!  With our beautiful new floor, widened aisles, and more natural light, your friendly neighborhood store now has a more open, spacious feel.  We we can't wait to see you there!

10th Annual Harvest Party and Local Eats: Sunday Sept 14th, 1p-6p.  921 Rogers St NW.

Details for the Contests:

Grow Off: Zucchinis in the Giant Zucchini contest must have been grown by the contestant.
Bake Off: Entries in the bake-off must not require refrigeration and must have been baked by the contestant.

There will be an entry table set-up for folks to sign-in.  Judging will begin at 3:30, the Derby at 4:30, and the rewards ceremony right after. 

Zucchini Car Derby Guidelines
Zucchini Car must be made by the participant. Adult supervision is allowed.Cars must be created at the party on the day of the event, with supplies provided.  You may bring your own zucchini, or use one of ours.
Race Day Procedures & Rules
  1. Car must be no more than 10″ wide and 12″ long
  2. The first car to cross the finish line in each race wins. The race officials have final say.
  3. Cars must cross the finish line in one piece to win the race and advance to the next round.
  4. There must be NO gas, battery, electric, wind-up or powered motors of any kind attached to the car. Fire works and explosives are prohibited.
  5. Entries are submitted by age group:
    Little Kids 10 and Under
    Middle Kids 11-18
    Big Kids Over 18
  6. Entries will be judged in the following classes:
  • Fastest Car- First one to the bottom wins! 
  • Best in Show: Creativity 
  • Best in Show: People’s Choice
If the entry rules are not followed, disqualification is possible. 
Categories: Local Food Blogs

June Garden

Erica's Garden - Sat, 06/14/2014 - 9:21am


May kind of just got swallowed up, didn’t it? Where’d it go?

I’ve been really enjoying the beautiful weather we have been having this spring. I’ve seen a ton of dragonflies sunning themselves on my pea trellis. I have been a super lazy gardener this year. I had a lot of things eaten by deer (which may have sent me into a mini-meltdown) but I rallied and decided not to worry about it.

Meh.

That’s my gardening philosophy this year.

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Roasted Eggplant Ratatouille

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

I have a confession. I love to mess up a perfectly good recipe, on purpose. I adore any recipe writer who is detailed and precise about their explanations and measurements. It helps me figure out how far I can veer before crashing into disaster. Becoming a decent cook is similar to any skill in life. Once you learn the basics you can begin tweaking, fiddling and meddling until you find your pulse. Your mark. Your touch. Typically, I try to follow a recipe exactly as written on the first attempt. Any attempt after, however, is fair game. Even at first attempt, I am liable to cut diagonally instead of vertically. I might add a handful of chopped basil instead of measuring it out precisely to 1/4 cup. I want to stay within the confines of the recipe without letting it confine my spirit, my passion for food. I, more than most, can become so lost in perfectly executing the details that I completely forget to enjoy myself. The final product may look and taste perfect but it will lack heart, soul and passion.

I’m really trying to remind myself of this lesson, especially lately. I fear I have gotten into a spell of looking a life as far to precise and perfect. As a set of skills I must develop and execute to succeed. As though anything in life that is executed perfectly, without heart, ever inspires anyone, including me. Inspiration is a feeling you get when you see someone else showcase a part of themselves that comes from a deep spark within. Perfection has nothing to do with that spark. This recipe falls right into that opportunity. Originally taken from Molly Wizenbergs book “A Homemade Life”, it is dictated with precision. She tells you how much to use, how thinly to slice and which way to cut and shape each vegetable. It doesn’t really matter. Really. I chopped and seeded with abandon. I measured and guessed. I threw in a bit of curry powered, garam masala and nutmeg. It still tasted delicious. In fact, I got so wrapped up in the process that I completely forgot to take a final picture. I think, in spirit, that is best. Then you never know what it was “supposed to” look like. You will only know what you created, how it tasted on your tongue and the way it made you feel when you were creating and that is all you need to know.

Position rack in middle of oven and preheat to 400 degrees. Arrange eggplant rounds in single layer on rimmed baking sheet. Pour 2 Tbsp olive oil in small bowl and brush onto eggplant. Flip slices and brush second slices as well, taking care that each as a thin coating of oil. Bake for 30 minutes, flipping slices halfway through, until soft and lightly browned on each side. Remove from oven and cool. (You can do this step a day or two ahead and refrigerate)

Warm 2 Tbsp olive oil over medium-high heat in a Dutch oven or large, deep skillet. Add zucchini and cook, stirring occasionally, until golden and just tender, 10—12 minutes. Remove it from the pan, taking care to leave behind any excess oil and set aside. Reduce heat to medium and add onion. Add a bit of oil if pan is dry. Cook, stirring occasionally until softened, about 4-5 minutes. Add bell pepper and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until just tender, but now browned, about 6 minutes. Add tomatoes, salt, thyme, and bay leaf and stir to combine. Reduce the heat to low, over and cook for 5 minutes. Add eggplant, zucchini, stir to incorporate and cook until everything is very tender, 15-20 minutes more. Taste and adjust the seasonings as necessary. Discard bay leaf and stir in basil.

Serve hot, warm or room temperature, with additional salt for sprinkling. This dish is even better a day or two later, as the flavors get time to mesh.

1 lb eggplant, sliced crosswise into 1-inch-thick rounds
olive oil
1 lb zucchini, trimmed, halved, lengthwise and sliced in to 1/2-inch thick half-moons
1 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced
1 large red bell pepper, cored, seeded and chopped
4 large cloves garlic, thinly sliced
5 Roma tomatoes, seeded and chopped
3/4 teaspoon salt
3 sprigs fresh thyme
1 bay leaf
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh basil

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Apple Tarte Tatin

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

I will begin this post with a great deal of apologizing. It will be the kind, however, that is done by any good friend that has been gone for far too long. The kind of apology that occurs after I knock the door, you open and I thrust a delicious dessert, still warm from the oven; begging to be drenched in vanilla ice cream and consumed. That is the only way to apologize for such an unexplained absence. I am not only apologizing to you, my dear friend, but to Molly Wizenberg. Writer of “A Homemade Life”, creater of the blog “Orangette” and my current personal hero. I believe the next few posts will be a direct copy of every recipe from her book. I can’t help myself. In my defense, she really should not have written such beautiful stories and recipes to match. As with any good idea, I want to try everything she writes about because she makes it all sound not only incredible, but familiar.

Familiar in the way you feel about your best friends spaghetti sauce and the way it always fills your house with the smell of love, comfort and safety. Familiar in the way that your favorite cookie recipe automatically makes everything feel right, even if they whole day fell to pieces. I want to make every recipe in Molly’s book because I feel like I know her and thus know the food she makes. I not only want to taste it all, I want to feel the way she feels when she eats it. Powerful stuff. So forgive the next few posts as I lavish adoration and attention. She may or may not be my idol right now, but I’m sure it will be evident the former is true.

I hope, only hope, to find some way to convey that feeling to everyone here. I want you to try these recipes that I create, not only because they will feed your bellies but because they will nourish your soul. I want to become familiar with y’all. In that spirit, I’m going to make it clear that my absence has occurred due to a family move to Austin, Texas. We are simultaneously settled, settling and unsettled. I’ve been inspired and found a renewed energy around being in the kitchen. I can’t wait to share what I’ve been doing. Tonight, however, I start with Molly’s Tarte Tatin.

It doesn’t look glamorous, and isn’t even the very first thing I would choose if waiting in line at a local bakery. I would be the fool in the end. This is astounding. My husband likened it to “creme brulee but better”. It is really best warm and served with a simple vanilla ice cream. I landed on this recipe because Molly described it as “a housewife in stilettos” and “it doesn’t dally with small talk. It reaches for your leg under the table”. Who wouldn’t want to eat something that is described with such passion? I know I am first in line. In fact, bakeries should really start describing their pastries in a similar manner…I would love to see what they invent.

Molly recommends puff pastry and I bought what I thought was puff pastry but was called Filo Dough. I’m not sure if they are really the same thing but it worked just fine. I just skipped the step where she asks you to roll out the dough really thin. I actually think I put to little dough in the pastry and would just put all of it in next time. It was still heart stopping and phenomenal…I can’t imagine how much better it would taste with even more dough. I may have just fainted from elation while writing that last sentence.

I also made a choice to buy whatever crisp, sweet apples I could find and used whole wheat pastry dough. Small changes but it didn’t seem to alter the incredible complexity of taste…as long as butter and sugar is involved…you are typically set. Since I don’t want to completely steal Molly’s thunder, I am making you go to her original post for directions. It’s the least I can do for a woman who talks about food the way a person might talk about a lover.

Juice of 1 lemon
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
5-6 large Apples
6 Tbsp (3 ounces) unsalted butter
About 14 ounces puff pastry

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Cheesy Spinach Crackers

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

A friend of mine had posted a link to a recipe for home made goldfish crackers a few months ago. I tried the recipe and my son gobbled down the entire batch, along with an entire group of mom’s I meet with on Monday mornings. It was such an enormous hit I thought often about making them again. Just as I got up the motivation I saw another post by a food blogger I follow that made spinach crackers. Whoa. The two recipes began making love in my mind and made this little baby. It was born from a desire to make great crackers with even more nutritional punch. My first attempt was soggy and sticky. I added more flour and less water and got a winner.

Preheat oven to 400 F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper or a non-stick mat. Or just use 1 baking sheet and bake 2 separate batches like I did. In a large bowl, whisk together the dry ingredients (flour, sugar, salt, dill). With a pastry blender (or two forks), cut in the butter into the flour mixture until crumbly. In a blender, blend the water and spinach until smooth. Now pour this into the flour and butter mixture. Stir this mixture until it just comes together and then gently knead with hands until it forms a ball. Be sure not to over handle the dough.

Split the dough in half. On a non-stick mat or lightly floured surface, roll out one half of the dough very thin (1/16th inch). Cut with cookie cutters or with a pizza roller. Gently lift off with fingers and place on prepared sheet (no need to space far apart as they don’t spread). Repeat as necessary. Sprinkle with more salt (I used Herbamare and it tasted amazing!) Bake for 9-10 minutes, rotating pan half way through baking to ensure more even baking. Crackers should be lightly golden when ready. My crackers took 10 minutes, but watch closely after 8 minutes. Be careful because they burn quickly. Cool completely on baking sheet and serve immediately. Store leftovers in a glass container.

1 & 1/2 cups (5 oz) 100% whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tbsp sugar
1/4-1/2 tsp salt (I used 1/2 tsp), plus more for sprinkling
1 tsp dried dill weed (or other herbs/spices of choice)
6 Tbsp butter
1/4 cup water
1 cup fresh spinach (30 grams)
2 Cups Cheddar Cheese, grated

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Bake Sale for the Food Bank

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

I know at every post you read you deeply wish I would just show up on your door step with everything cooked and ready for your immediate consumption. I know your drool at every photo, short circuits your keyboard and you’ve bought 100 in the last two years I have been posting. I know you bookmark the recipes with every intention of trying them on some night when inspiration and energy consumes you, only to discover you end up falling asleep on the couch every night with a empty bowl of ice cream on the coffee table. Oh I know. I know because I do it to. I bookmark recipes from other blogs and tear out photos and inspiration from magazines and Pinterest. All the while wishing they would just materialize in front of me so I could eat it. Sometimes it is not the baking and cooking I enjoy so much. It is actually just the eating. I also know how excited I would be if some of my favorite bloggers were just happening to sell their baked goods. I would probably pee my pants due to complete elation if I knew I could buy these goods and the proceeds would go to benefit my local food bank. I just might have a heart attack if I could also meet these bloggers. Guess what? It’s happening. Jenni from The Plum Palate is putting together an incredible event to benefit the Olympia Food Bank. You should check out her write up for the full details but I can promise incredible food from eight local food bloggers at only 1$ per item. Seriously? You gotta do it. Oh and did I mention there will be a raffle to win gift certificates to some incredible local bakeries such as Bearded Lady, San Francisco Street Bakery, Blue Heron Bakery, 8 Arms Bakery, and Bonjour Cupcakes.

Both cash and food donations will be valid for tickets you can exchange for baked goods. And remember, the food bank accepts both perishable and non-perishable items. That means you can donate almost anything, from a package of pasta to a bunch of carrots. I will be there from 5-7 and I will be making the following:

Chocolate Chip Cookies

Seven Layer Cookies

Vegan Brownies

Peanut Butter Chocolate Pillows

Visit our Facebook event page. Come down. Enter a raffle. Donate and eat some food all for an incredible cause.

Friday, April 27 from 5-10
Located at Make Olympia street market at Arts Walk, 100 block of Columbia
All proceeds benefit the Olympia Food Bank
1$ or food donation for each baked good
Raffle with gift certificates from local bakeries

Bloggers that will be participating:

Christine Ciancetta

Fresh Scratch

Krista and Jess

Mocavore

Real Food NW

OlyEats

The Plum Palate

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Vegetable Lasagna

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

My son is at an age now where he can legitimately help out in the kitchen. The tasks must be simple and supervised but it is a fantasy fulfilled. When he was much younger my sister bought him a full chef kitchen kit. Even though he was no where near old enough to utilize the toys, I pulled them out and he used them as rattles and items to chew and drool upon. I still dream of the day he will pick the recipe and I will help him in his determination to make our family a meal. I’m far ahead of myself but these small moments prep me for a completion of that dream and fill my days with little moments of contented bliss and fulfillment as a human being.

There are days when I am multitasking a boiling pot, frying chicken and roasting vegetables that I wish he didn’t have such a keen fascination with what I was doing in the kitchen. On this particular day, however, I prepped the meal during his nap, excited for his participation once he woke up. I lined up all the ingredients and he stood on a chair and diligently placed one layer on top of another. The focus and concentration out of this kid at such a young age still astounds me. The meal was incredible and tasted even better with that special layer of dreams and fantasies fulfilled.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Make white sauce: Melt butter in a medium skillet over medium heat. Stir in flour with a wooden spoon and cook until mixture darkens slightly in color, about 2 minutes. Whisk in the milk and bring to a boil. Smash and peel garlic. Reduce the heat to maintain a gentle simmer and add the garlic. Cook, whisking occasionally, until thick (about the consistency of yogurt), about 20 minutes. Season with salt, cayenne and nutmeg.

Bring a large pot of cold water to a boil over high heat and salt generously. Add lasagna noodles to boiling water and cook until ardent. Drain, but do not rinse and lay each noodle out flat on a work surface.

Lightly grease a 9x13 baking dish with olive oil. Use hands to squeeze as much water as you can from the spinach (if frozen); set aside. Heat 2 Tbsp olive oil in large skillet over medium heat. Cook meat or mushrooms with spinach and 1/2 tsp salt. Cook until meat is no longer pink or mushrooms are softened, about 5 minutes. Tear basil leaves over the mixture and toss.

Cover bottom of the prepared baking dish with 3 of the noodles. Top with 1/4 cup grated cheese, 3/4 cup tomato sauce, 1/2 cup white sauce and 1/3 of the sausage/mushroom mixture. Season with black pepper.

Add another layer of 3 noodles. Repeat twice and dot the top layer of noodles with the remaining tomato sauce, white sauce and grated cheese, making sure to dot some tomato sauce around the edges so that the noodles don’t dry out. Bake, uncovered for 45 minutes or until hot and bubbly. Let lasagna stand for 10 minutes before serving.

This will freeze really well. After baking, let rest and freeze whole or in portions.

Adapted from “How to boil water. Life beyond takeout” by The Food Network

White Sauce
3 Tbsp unsalted butter
1/4 cup all purpose flour
4 cups milk
3 cloves garlic
1 tsp salt
pinch cayenne pepper
pinch freshly grated nutmeg

Lasagna
12 whole wheat lasagna noodles
10 oz fresh or frozen spinach (if frozen, thaw)
2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
12 oz ground beef or chopped mushrooms
1/2 tsp salt
2 handfuls lightly packed fresh basil leaves (optional)
1 1/4 cups freshly grated grana-style cheese such as Parmesan or Pecorino Romano
3 cups prepared tomato sauce at room temp
Freshly ground black pepper

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Apple Cake

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

Tis the season that the weather begins to tease and taunt. Currently, the sun is out and I’m donning shorts and sandals. Tomorrow I could be in three layers of clothing and shivering as the rain pelters my face. This brings me no delight. It’s downright frustrating. It’s like someone giving you the most amazing bite of food you have ever had in your life and as you beg for more they just smile and say, “You will get more at some point but I’m not gonna tell you when”. Begin meltdown and an adult tantrum. This cake, however, is the ideal tantrum tamer. It’s like and flakey with a touch of apples, which happen to be in season at the farmers market, leftover from last September. It is also dense enough to go with a warm cup of coffee as the rain smothers your windows and you glare at the clouds.

I would love to try this recipe with whole wheat pastry flour, less sugar and butter and some flax in place of one egg. For now, however, it was exactly what the doctor ordered. Sugar and all. The original recipe is from Honey and Jam. She is incredible. I love anything I have ever made from her blog. Simple. Authentic. Perfect. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

Preheat the oven to 350. Butter a 9 inch round baking pan.Whisk together flour, baking powder and salt together in a bowl.Cream the butter, sugar and lemon zest on medium-high speed for 3 to 5 minutes, until light and fluffy. Add the eggs one at a time, scraping down the sides of the bowl after each addition, then stir in vanilla.

Add the flour mixture all at once and mix on a low speed just until incorporated. Pour (more like spoon, it will be very thick) into the prepared pan.

Score the peeled side of the apples with the tines of a fork and arrange the apples atop the batter around the perimeter with 1 slice in the middle (I cut each large slice into 3-4 small slices)

Sprinkle with turbinado sugar and bake for 35-40 minutes, or until the cake is lightly golden and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Sometimes the batter around the apples looks slightly underdone, but don’t worry; it’s just the moisture from the apples.

1 cup all purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
1/2 cup unsalted butter
1/2 cup sugar
zest of 1 lemon
2 eggs
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
2 apples, peeled, cored, and each cut into 6 pieces
2 tablespoons of turbinado sugar

Categories: Local Food Blogs

“Uchiko” Roasted Brussel Sprouts with Thai Sweet Chili Sauce

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

Our family recently traveled to Austin. The reasons for travel were mostly business and SXSW related tomfoolery. It’s an amazing world. Really. Another world. It doesn’t even feel like a state that’s connected to the United States of America. It’s warm. All. The. Time. The people are unbelievably friendly and charming. They really live up to the stereotype of southern hospitality. It was a mecca for our family. It was a trip I enjoyed from the third day to the last. The first two days it rained. Hard. Everyone came outside to watch as though it were some bizarre anomaly like a comet dipping out of the sky on to the ground or a leprechaun really appearing at the end of the rainbow. I was, however, grumpy. I flew five hours with a toddler for more rain? No thanks.

Then on the third day the skies opened like a dark curtain on a stage and the sun made its grand entrance.We spent an unmentionable amount of time outdoors and consuming food, all with very close friends. This recipe is for a deeply good friend. He took us to a place called Uchiko. We waited almost an hour to get inside. I was ready to throw in the towel. My toddler was ready to throw everything. I was starting to get “hangry” a vicious combination of hungry and angry. I’m so glad I stayed. Each dish was an orgasm just waiting to happen inside my mouth. I believe I may have unintentionally reenacted the scene from “When Harry Met Sally”. You know the one. The first dish was roasted brussel sprouts in a thai chili sauce. My tongue wasn’t prepared for such an onslaught of amazingness. I vowed I would come home and replicate it and I think I did.

Cut brussel sprouts in quarters and place in 13x9 glass baking dish. Coat with olive oil, brown sugar, salt and pepper. Bake at 400 degrees for 40-50 minutes or until very soft and golden. Remove from oven and stir. Switch temperature on oven to a low broil. Broil for 5 minutes. It’s okay if it burns a bit on the edges….it supposed to give it extra crisp. Remove from oven and cover with sweet chili thai sauce. Consume happily. Chopsticks make it even more fun. The measurements for ingredients are not rigid. The recipe can easily be sized down for just one or increased for a party. Add more brown sugar if you want it sweeter or more spices if you enjoy that blow to the mouth.

2-3 lbs brussel sprouts
1 Tbsp brown sugar
1 Tbsp Olive oil
salt and pepper
Bottle of Sweet Chili Thai Sauce (found in most stores)

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Easy Granola Bars

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

I once wrote about my dear dislike for granola, the store bought kind, only to happily discover that it came alive when cooked at home. The belief that I knew what I did and did not like began to adjust itself. I realized that most anything I can make at home I really enjoy. Most anything. There are a few incidents that we never speak of and won’t dare mention here. I have also taken a stab at granola bars. While enjoyable, they are loaded with sugar and jam and don’t speak to that sweet and salty mix I really enjoy in the perfect snack.

A friend of mine shared that she was trying to decrease the amount of packaged and store bought goodies. Replacing them with as many home made versions as possible. This woman has two small children and a husband who is in the depths of his medical internship and thus rarely home. I admire her and was shocked she has the time to make anything. She insisted they were terribly easy so I requested the recipe. It really is incredibly easy and quick and delicious. When I hear those words combined, I usually do a somersault of glee and put it on the blog. In that order.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Combine ground flax seeds and water. Set aside. Combine oats, flour, baking powder, salt and sugar in mixing bowl. Stir in raisins and chocolate chips. In separate bowl, combine maple syrup and nut butter and mix until smooth. Combine nut butter mixture with flaxseed-water mixture.

Add wet mixture to dry and stir well. The mixture will seem dry, but keep stirring until fully integrated. Press mixture into 8x8 inch pan that has been sprayed with cooking spray. Bake for 15 minutes. Allow pan to cool slightly, then cut into bars and transfer to cooling rack.

Peas and Thank You Cookbook
3 Tbsp ground flax seeds
1/4 cup + 2 Tbsp water
2 cups old-fashioned oats
1/2 cup whole wheat pastry flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 cup organic sugar
1/2 cup raisins or other dried fruit
1/4 cup chocolate chips
1/3 cup maple syrup
1/2 cup nut butter of your choice

I also added about 1/4 cup coconut flakes.

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Saucy White Fish

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

I’ve thoroughly enjoyed blogging about food and telling stories about my personal life. It has, however, become a large obstacle in my desire to post at least twice a week. The thought of creating a story, theme and some clever words, leaves my butt cemented to the chair in protest. I believe it has to do with this wonderful change in life where I have very interesting, incredible and exciting things occurring every day. The thought of staring at a computer screen while my boy naps is always on the bottom of my list. It is not as though I haven’t been in the kitchen. Quite the contrast, I can seem to stay out of it. Even to sit down and write a little post about what exactly I am doing in that very kitchen. So today, I am going to share a recipe and commit to sharing at least two recipes a week.

The story may not be as clever, the pictures may not be as plentiful or in depth, yet I am sure that is not what has really mattered to anyone. What really matters is whether the food that comes out at the end is any good. Trust me, it is always good. The original recipe came from Olympia Seafood Company, a local seafood supplier. The woman actually just told me the bare bones while exchanging fish and money over the counter.

Set your oven for 380 degrees and line a baking dish with foil for easy clean-up later.  In a fry pan, sauté your onion, carrot, mushrooms and garlic in the olive oil until desired tenderness and set aside to cool for a few minutes.  Once it’s not blazing hot, stir the sour cream into the onion/garlic mixture.  Place the fish in the baking dish and pour the sour cream and onion mixture over the top, smoothing it out evenly.  Bake for about 18 minutes and then check for doneness. Enjoy!

1 pound fresh white fish, skinned (servings for 2-3)
salt
1 yellow or sweet onion, chopped
5-6 cloves garlic, diced
1 carrot, diced
4-5 oz mushrooms, diced
1T olive oil
¾ cup sour cream

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Inspired Quinoa Bean Soup

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

I was lavished with food and gifts a few weeks ago by some incredible friends in Seattle. My husband was in Africa on a retreat for his job. He claims he worked but I have yet to see a photo to substantiate this claim. There were many photos, however, of the beach, food that made me drool and shorts. Lets get back to me and my son and the snow storm that ensued while he was away. Just before the storm, my son and I stayed with these women who I love dearly and who love my son dearly and that makes me swoon all over them in a somewhat inappropriate manner. The meals they prepared were magazine worthy and one dish in particular made me go back for at least four bowls.

It was a soup made of quinoa, kale, potatoes and love. It sang gently of comfort and health, and was exactly what we needed while my husband was so far away. I was not able to obtain the recipe from my friend but decided to get creative one night and make something as close as possible to what we had eaten but using only my own personal knowledge and “expertise”. I have to say, I really hit it out of the ball park with this one. I made enough to give to a friend and she raved and demanded the recipe. I fluffed my chest out appropriately and informed her it was actually my very own recipe. I may have strut a bit when I walked later that day, maybe.

Saute onion and carrots in oil over medium heat until softened. Add garlic cook another 30 seconds.

Add broth and beans and bring to boil. Reduce to simmer, cover and cook 30 minutes.

Add potatoes and rutabaga, cover and cook another 30 minutes.


Return to boil. Add quinoa, spices and greens, reduce heat, cover and simmer another 15-20 minutes or until quinoa is soft. Remove from heat and serve with thick, hearty bread.

I also added a bit of leftover shredded chicken that was in our fridge. I think it was a wonderful addition but not at all necessary.

1-3 Tbsp oil (I used coconut)
2-3 carrots, diced
1 small onion, diced
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 cup dried beans (soaked for 8 hours or overnight)
2 cups vegetable broth or water
3 small potatoes, diced
1 rutabaga, diced
1 cup uncooked quinoa
1 bunch greens (kale, spinach, swiss chard), finely chopped
spices as desired *
salt and pepper to taste

* I used 1 tsp cumin, 1 tsp curry powder and 2 tsp thyme

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Roasted Nuts & Mango Salad

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

I was invited over for dinner and asked to bring a salad. The main course was sweet potato and bean enchiladas. I know how to chop up vegetables and throw them together last minute, buy some dressing and call it a day. On this particular day, however, I had some extra time and a desire to roast nuts in a sweet and savory mix. I made this mix during Thanksgiving as a way to use all the extra pumpkin seeds I had from several huge pumpkins that were left over from Halloween. My nephews were around for the holiday and munched on the mix and begged me to send them some in the mail. Fast forward to several months and I finally decided I had put it off long enough. I wanted to mail my promise. I was thus inspired by the nut mix to make a sweet and spicy mango salad to accompany our dinner.

The nut mix takes no time at all and is incredibly delicious. A great way to snack with healthy intentions. The salad is also very quick and keeps well for at least 3 days once mixed (without the dressing). Heat the oven (or toaster oven) to 350°. Spread the nuts on a baking sheet and toast them for 6 minutes or until they are fragrant and their color deepens slightly. In a medium-size bowl, stir together the spice mix.

In a saucepan, combine the glaze ingredients and bring them to a boil over medium heat, whisking constantly. Stir in the toasted nuts and continue to stir until all the nuts are shiny and the liquid is gone, about 1 to 2 minutes.

Move the glazed nuts to a mixing bowl, sprinkle on the spice mix, and toss them well to coat. Spread the coated nuts on a cookie sheet and return them to the oven for another 4 minutes; check regularly to make sure they don’t burn. Remove and let cool. Makes 2 cups.

Mix together ingredients for dressing in a bottle with a lid. I use old salad dressing bottles. Shake well. Chop 1/2 cup of nuts. Place greens and mango in large salad bowl. Top with chopped nuts. You can dress the salad in the bowl or allow each person to dress it to their liking. The undressed salad will last longer as left overs in the fridge.

I wish I had remembered to take a photo of the final product but alas…I was far to busy consuming it. Enjoy!

2 cups mixed nuts

Spice Mix:
2 tablespoons sugar
1 tsp teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 tsp ginger
1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper or smoked paprika

Glaze:
1 tablespoon water
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 teaspoon brown sugar
1 tablespoon canola or coconut oil

Salad:

1 manco, peeled and cut in chunks
4 cups greens

Dressing:

1/2 cup olive oil
1/4 cup mango juice
1/8 cup apple cider vinegar
1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1 tsp maple syrup
1/2 tsp cayenne or smoked paprika
salt and pepper to taste

Categories: Local Food Blogs

Meat Veggie Burgers

Pure Hunger - Sun, 11/04/2012 - 1:00am

This post will be short and sweet. I don’t have a lot to say. My soap box has been left for this surprising sunshine and I’m feeling like a nap could be a better way to spend my “free time” than writing a long post. These burgers are my own invention upon realizing I had extra ground meat and a desire to get more veggies into my son’s diet. It’s really not all that precise and you could make tons of substitutions. To say he enjoyed these would be so sadly inaccurate. He sucked them down so fast I could hardly remember whether I had put one on his plate or not. This action was coincided with lots of “mmmmm” sounds. This is a boy that will pull spinach out of his eggs….so the fact that he inhaled the greens in this burger just proves how delicious it must have been.

Mix together all ingredients until well incorporated. Shape into patties. Heat frying pan with a scant layer of oil. Fry on both sides about 5 minutes or until cooked all the way through. These could probably be baked as well at 350 degrees for about 10-15 minutes. I didn’t get a chance to try that out but I would love to hear if someone else does.

.5 lbs ground meat
1 cup finely chopped greens
1/2 cup grated cheese
2 Tbsp ground flax
1 tsp cumin
1/4 cup mashed sweet potato (or one egg)
oil for frying

Categories: Local Food Blogs
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