Recent local blog posts

Beaver Sign at the Capitol Lake Interpretive Center

Bees, Birds & Butterflies - Sun, 11/27/2016 - 1:33pm
 Text and photos by Nancy Partlow© Yesterday, I came across a large alder tree that beavers had toppled across the CLIC main trail.     
I spoke to a couple who were walking by.  I commented that  "it must be really tough to be an alder tree here because of the beavers."  The woman asked if I really thought beavers had brought the tree down.  I showed her tooth marks on the branch stubs and wood chips littering the ground.  She was amazed.  She didn't know that there are beavers at Capitol Lake.

Beaver tree-gnawing activity at the CLIC has increased in the last few weeks as the weather has gotten colder, just as it does every year.
Even though I've searched extensively for a beaver lodge nearby, I haven't been able to find it  yet. I think it's probably tucked away in one of the two CLIC wetland ponds.  I only wish I could have returned after nightfall to watch the beavers continue to harvest branches from their felled tree. That would have been really cool.  A friend told me he once saw a beaver on a CLIC trail during the day.  I would have loved to see that! 
I've often observed a male Anna's hummingbird perched in the upper branches of this alder, vocalizing and defending from all comers the large twinberry bush right across the trail, and  a rambling stand of salmonberry bushes close by.  Both these shrubs are good sources of hummingbird nectar when they're in flower.  I guess the bird will just have to find another perch now. I also found a bushtit nest lying in the middle of the trail, probably knocked from nearby branches by the wind.  It  retained its still-beautiful construction of natural materials - moss, twigs, lichens and spider's web.     Yesterday's soggy weather could have hardly been less conducive for a nature walk.  But with a good umbrella I was able to take a much-needed stroll and respite.   My discoveries on the CLIC trail show me that even on the worst of days, nature  provides endless opportunities for wonder, restoration and learning.   In this season of thanks-giving, I am grateful for that. 
Categories: Local Environment

Beaver Sign at the Capitol Lake Interpretive Center

Bees, Birds & Butterflies - Sun, 11/27/2016 - 1:33pm
 Text and photos by Nancy Partlow© Yesterday, I came across a large alder tree that beavers had toppled across the CLIC main trail.     
I spoke to a couple who were walking by.  I commented that  "it must be really tough to be an alder tree here because of the beavers."  The woman asked if I really thought beavers had brought the tree down.  I showed her tooth marks on the branch stubs and wood chips littering the ground.  She was amazed.  She didn't know that there are beavers at Capitol Lake.

Beaver tree-gnawing activity at the CLIC has increased in the last few weeks as the weather has gotten colder, just as it does every year.
Even though I've searched extensively for a beaver lodge nearby, I haven't been able to find it  yet. I think it's probably tucked away in one of the two CLIC wetland ponds.  I only wish I could have returned after nightfall to watch the beavers continue to harvest branches from their felled tree. That would have been really cool.  A friend told me he once saw a beaver on a CLIC trail during the day.  I would have loved to see that! 
I've often observed a male Anna's hummingbird perched in the upper branches of this alder, vocalizing and defending from all comers the large twinberry bush right across the trail, and  a rambling stand of salmonberry bushes close by.  Both these shrubs are good sources of hummingbird nectar when they're in flower.  I guess the bird will just have to find another perch now. I also found a kinglet nest lying in the middle of the trail, probably knocked from nearby branches by the wind.  It  retained its still-beautiful construction of natural materials - moss, twigs, lichens and spider's web.     Yesterday's soggy weather could have hardly been less conducive for a nature walk.  But with a good umbrella I was able to take a much-needed stroll and respite.   My discoveries on the CLIC trail show me that even on the worst of days, nature  provides endless opportunities for wonder, restoration and learning.   In this season of thanks-giving, I am grateful for that. 
Categories: Local Environment

Voetberg Family Christmas Show Will Delight Families Again at the Centralia Fox Theatre

Thurston Talk - Sun, 11/27/2016 - 6:00am

ThurstonTalk

There is nothing better than celebrating the holiday season with a family outing. This year, the historic Centralia Fox Theatre is proud to present the 4th annual Voetberg Family Christmas Show on December 17 and 18. It will be the first live music event since the theater reopened on October 29. “Every performance has been […]

Lifespan Construction’s Company Culture Benefits Clients

Thurston Talk - Sun, 11/27/2016 - 6:00am

ThurstonTalk

The company culture at Lifespan Construction encourages positive communication between customers and clients alike. Owner Chris McDonald calls this the “H factor,” a guiding principle of the business that founded with his wife, Jennie, in 2010. What began as a husband and wife team has evolved into a very successful operation with 13 full-time employees. […]

US Martial Arts Center Receives State Award for Giving Back

Thurston Talk - Sat, 11/26/2016 - 10:20am

ThurstonTalk

Submitted by US Martial Arts Center Four Washington companies have been chosen as recipients of the 2016 Corporations for Communities Award, which honors exceptional Washington businesses that make it a priority to help their communities. The four businesses include Kent-based Sleep Train, Bellvue-based Republic Services and Birch Equipment out of Bellingham.  Olympia’s own US Martial […]

Giving a Gift is the Gift Itself – Ways to Donate Toys and Gifts to Thurston County Kids

Thurston Talk - Sat, 11/26/2016 - 6:00am

ThurstonTalk

Sometimes a gift is more than a gift. For children and their families facing hardships, gifts are hard to come by financially and even emotionally. We are fortunate that Thurston County people and organizations think ahead for these children, for whom, a gift means the world. That’s only one side of the story though. For […]

Reduce Your Environmental Footprint This Holiday Season

Thurston Talk - Sat, 11/26/2016 - 6:00am

ThurstonTalk

Americans throw away 25% more trash during the holiday season than they do during the rest of the year, according to the Thurston County Solid Waste Program. By being mindful of your holiday habits, you can reduce the amount of trash you toss this year. Aside from making a positive impact on the environment, reducing […]

Joby Shimomura Directs Focus Toward Colorful Expression in Life

Thurston Talk - Sat, 11/26/2016 - 6:00am

ThurstonTalk

Art, intention, and action are all daring ways to make a statement, not only for others but also for oneself. Joby Shimomura understands what it’s worth to truly follow her calling in life. After 20 dedicated years of working in government as Washington governor Jay Inslee’s chief of staff, she is now representing a more […]

Olympia’s First Poet Laureate: Amy Solomon-Minarchi

Janine's Little Hollywood - Fri, 11/25/2016 - 8:02pm

Above: Amy Leah Solomon-Minarchi was selected to be Olympia's first poet laureate. About the position, Solomon-Minarchi says, “It’s not about me - it’s about uniting people in Olympia. I can do this because I care about Olympia and people’s stories….” 
In an interview with Little Hollywood, Solomon-Minarchi explores her role, youth and military life voices, current events, and the culture of Olympia
By Janine Gateshttps://janineslittlehollywood.blogspot.com
The City of Olympia now has its first poet laureate, Amy Leah Solomon-Minarchi.
Based upon the recommendation of a city arts selection committee, the Olympia city council appointed Solomon-Minarchi to the new position on Tuesday. 
Solomon-Minarchi sat down with Little Hollywood on Friday to speak about the position, and share her thoughts about the meaning and purpose of poetry, youth and other voices that are not often heard, and the changing culture of Olympia. 
Even in an interview, Solomon-Minarchi’s words are eloquent, well-chosen, and quietly spoken, capturing powerful images. 
Solomon-Minarchi, an English, creative writing, and philosophy teacher for 11th and 12th graders at North Thurston High School, is also the advisor for the school’s “Write Club,” and advisor and publisher of the school’s literary magazine, “The Art of Words.”
She is also a choreographer at the school, designing and implementing dances with students for the school musical and Spring Arts Showcase productions. 
A member and student of the Richard Hugo House in Seattle, Solomon-Minarchi received her undergraduate degree from Rutgers University, and received her master’s in teaching degree from The Evergreen State College in 2010. She has won many honors and awards.
Solomon-Minarchi grew up in New Jersey and has lived in Olympia for eight years. She is expected to fulfill her duties for two years and will receive a $1,000 stipend per year.
“Olympia’s diverse populations are at a serious crossroads in which no one dare cross the road. Let poetry be the place where we enter the crosswalk,” Solomon-Minarchi said in her application. 
She proposed a program called, “I Hear Olympia Singing,” in which she says she will build community through poetry, offering literary arts workshops with the schools that have the least resources and highest need for art programs and enrichment.
She also envisions writing contests and readings with outreach to Community Youth Services and Olympians at large to elevate perception and engagement in the growing downtown arts core. 
Her Writing the City program would hold open calls for short poems, a semi-annual public art display, and a monthly walking tour and writing series that will take students to rotating spaces around the city to practice capturing sensory imagery and sound.
Ultimately, at the end of her term, Solomon-Minarchi says she would work toward editing an anthology of poems that captures Olympia “in all its burgeoning flux that will celebrate the local and rich working history of Olympia and the new, five-story culture of artist lofts, convention centers and Seattle transplants buying property in cash, who look with wide wonder at the eclectic promise of growing roots here.”
Solomon-Minarchi was chosen out of 10 applicants by a committee of five individuals who met for one and a half hours to discuss the applications. Little Hollywood was at the October 27 meeting to observe the selection process.
When they arrived at their decision, they said Solomon-Minarchi, “….has an energy that sets her apart from the others…she’s youth focused and very approachable and accessible. Her poetry is so place-based….She’s someone who will grow the (poet laureate) program and engage us….good presence….Her Writing the City program is so cool….”
The suggestion to have a city poet laureate arose out of a committee referral in 2015 and proceeded through the city’s arts advisory committee to promote poetry as an art form and contribute to a sense of place. 
Stephanie Johnson, city parks, arts and recreation program staff, facilitated the nomination selection and recommendation process. Applicants were referred to by number, not name, while they watched submitted video presentations and evaluated application strengths and weaknesses. The applicants were winnowed down to Solomon-Minarchi and her alternate, Cecily Markham.
Johnson and the committee looked at the selection process paved by other cities such as Tacoma, Fresno, and Reno. Outreach was done through the city website, the city’s Arts Digest email list, the Olympia Poetry Network, and the Old Growth Poetry Network. 
Solomon-Minarchi’s poem, Suburban Danger, was one of the poems she submitted to the arts committee for consideration.
It was inspired, she said, by a brief brush with a speeding car while walking a baby and big dog through the crosswalk at 7th Avenue SE and Boundary, in Olympia’s eastside neighborhood.
Suburban Danger
Cars speed past pedestrians in crosswalkswhile babies stain Snugglies, dogs strain leashesdrivers yell, 900 points, and mean it.
Mount Rainier so majestic, could we climb it if the tsunami hits? Better yet seek the water towerpack the power bars, guzzle Powerade
and wait to be saved. Or if it eruptscould we outrun the lava flow in ourPrius? Would we run out of gas mid-flee?
If only my mother were here. We couldbe generations until the white wavesWash us out to sea, or the red hand claims us.


Above: Chum salmon make their journey back to spawn last week at McLane Creek Nature Trail in Olympia. Stream Team salmon stewards explained how baby salmon imprint on the water in their home stream. When they migrate back from their stay in the ocean, biologists believe they recognize the smell of McLane Creek by its distinctive smell.
Solomon-Minarchi was asked what she feels South Sound youth need to express, and what poetry might mean to them.
“Young people have a lot to share. They have a treasure trove of stories to tell. Poetry is an efficient way to get out their emotions. Students are working on how their voices have meaning, because, as they are growing and developing, at 16 - 17, this is the time they are playing with their voice. They are saying, ‘What does this mean?’ And once they graduate, they are just like little fish in a huge ocean. 
“What poetry might mean to them is finding a way to look around themselves, ground themselves, and face the emotions they are feeling and chronicle the new experiences they are having, whether it is college, a job, relationships…it’s all funny, strange, and new.
“They are also figuring out when to tell their stories, what’s relevant, and how much to share. You know, you’ve got students that just want to tell you every little thing, and others hold it all in and lock it up in a box. 

“The role of poetry, or a teacher of writing, is to give them space to be able to sort out those emotions together. They are in a community. They are not alone. Storytelling is powerful and the cultures that last have stories to tell, pass on, and are meaningful. Then there’s the question of how to tell the story. There’s not just one way….”
Asked what local or national poetry she appreciates, Solomon-Minarchi mentioned the art of Elizabeth Austen, a recent Washington State Poet Laureate, who wrote the chapbook, Every Dress a Decision, a finalist for the 2012 Washington State Book Award in poetry. 
She also mentioned the poetry of Brian Turner, a noncommissioned officer in the Iraq War.
Solomon-Minarchi says she will capture the voices of veterans, not because she is one, but because her husband is, and she wants to honor them with an open heart.
“For those who care for veterans, it’s not an easy job – there’s heartache, longing, uncertainty. I’d like to provide a counterpoint voice to say, ‘Hey, this is what it was like back home….”’
There’s also a place for Walt Whitman. “When I ask students to read his poetry, I get groans,” she laughed. “They ask, ‘How do I relate to him?’” Solomon-Minarchi says that is a valid response.
“I know that my love of poetry comes from the generative process of writing, and writing together with people, being able to see the same thing – going to Percival Landing and looking out onto the Sound. 
“My poem might be very, very different from the person sitting next to me, and yet we both share that experience and that brings us together. Part of what I want to do is have open-mic at the Olympia Farmer’s Market. It takes courage to say it in front of others and celebrate our voice in the moment.”
Briefly touching upon the city’s current events, Solomon-Minarchi said she was watching Tuesday evening’s city council meeting from home, and heard Olympia Police Chief Ronnie Roberts’ comments about the Port of Olympia and the recent rail blockade of a Union Pacific train by protesters in downtown Olympia.
“Being in this position right now will be very interesting. We have stories, but we are also making stories together. There is fear in the unknown, and what kind of direction Olympia is going to go in….We see the tall buildings going up and we’re missing our small town….
“The culture will change, and there’s a lot of emotion about that, whether it’s anxiety about how that will play out, and whether we’ll be able to keep the things that make us different, like being able to go down to the railroad track at 4:00 a.m. and say, ‘This is not ok.’ This is real. Over the next two years, we want, through poetry, to capture the identity of Olympia, the changing of Olympia, and what brings us together.”
Above: Children and parent volunteers from Roosevelt Elementary School observe the salmon run at McLane Creek Nature Trail last Thursday afternoon in Olympia. A group of older children from North Thurston High School were also on the trail, and were being encouraged by a teacher to “....zoom out and sketch the greater ecosystem....”

Small Businesses Bring Big Rewards to Downtown Olympia

Thurston Talk - Fri, 11/25/2016 - 6:00am

ThurstonTalk

On Saturday, November 26, the expression “shop small” holds special significance for local store owners. Eateries, theatres, clothes shops, and independent book stores take center stage and remind our community of the vibrant offerings along our downtown streets. In 2010, American Express started the Small Business Saturday movement to encourage people to purposefully spend their […]

Ring in the Holidays with The Washington Center

Thurston Talk - Fri, 11/25/2016 - 6:00am

ThurstonTalk

With the arrival of Thanksgiving weekend, most of us “officially” begin the holiday season, and, downtown Olympia is no exception. Concerts, celebrations, special shopping events and community gatherings pepper the calendar throughout the end of November and the entire month of December. In the middle of it all is The Washington Center for the Performing […]

Neighborhood Notes – Fresh Cut for Christmas: Thurston County Christmas Tree Farms

Thurston Talk - Fri, 11/25/2016 - 6:00am

ThurstonTalk

Despite my children’s insistence that we decorate for every holiday, I mostly hold out for Christmas. While there may be a few wooden turkeys and papier-mâché pumpkins floating around the house in the fall, it’s Christmas décor that I adore. And, the crowning jewel, the centerpiece of it all, is the Christmas tree. We cut […]

Olympia Thanksgiving Weekend Event Calendar

Thurston Talk - Thu, 11/24/2016 - 6:00am

ThurstonTalk

From our family to yours, we wish you a Thanksgiving meal filled with friendly conversation, contentment and joy.  Here’s what is going on around Olympia during Thanksgiving weekend. Act local this holiday season with this article about ways to volunteer. Get cooking tips and last minute recipe ideas from our food writer, Mary Ellen Psaltis. […]

Thrifty Thurston Finds Holiday Music Concerts Throughout Olympia

Thurston Talk - Thu, 11/24/2016 - 6:00am

ThurstonTalk

If you’re looking to keep your family entertained during the Holidays, there is no shortage of free and low cost music and family fun happening in Thurston County throughout November and December. Take a look at the things we found with just a few strokes of the computer keys. Events are listed in chronological order […]

Passengers Ride Free on Intercity Transit’s Jingle Bus

Thurston Talk - Thu, 11/24/2016 - 6:00am

ThurstonTalk

Intercity Transit riders will have a little help getting in a holiday mood once again this year when the Jingle Bus comes to town. From the day after Thanksgiving until Friday, December 30, commuters will ride for free on a rotating schedule of 19 fixed routes. “When people get on, it’s completely free,” says Intercity […]

Welcome the Season with Downtown for the Holidays

Thurston Talk - Thu, 11/24/2016 - 6:00am

ThurstonTalk

As November rounds out into December, it’s a perfect time to reflect and pause in celebration of the season. In Olympia, the Olympia Downtown Association (ODA) creates space for reflection and gratitude with all things festive and fun at the annual Downtown for the Holidays event. On Sunday, November 27, downtown Olympia will transform into […]

Men’s Soccer Players and Coach Honored by NWAC

Thurston Talk - Wed, 11/23/2016 - 9:40pm

ThurstonTalk

Submitted by South Puget Sound Community College Clipper Athletics and SPSCC celebrate as the Northwest Athletic Conference (NWAC) awarded the men’s soccer team with three distinguished awards at the close of the 2016 season.  Awards include a region all-star, all-academic award, and co-coach of the year selections. Juan Vega, forward, selected for South-West All-Star Team. […]

Twin Harbors Opens 3 Days of Razor Clam Digging

Thurston Talk - Wed, 11/23/2016 - 9:31pm

ThurstonTalk

Submitted by The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) Razor clam diggers can return to Twin Harbors beach for a three-day opening that begins Nov. 26, state shellfish managers said today.  The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the opening on evening tides at Twin Harbors after marine toxin tests confirmed clams […]

Barb O'Neill's Family and Friends 47th Annual Thanksgiving Meal

Janine's Little Hollywood - Wed, 11/23/2016 - 6:34pm

Above: Rodney O’Neill greets friends as he carries on his mother’s legacy with Barb O'Neill's Family and Friends Thanksgiving event. Barb O’Neill started the meal for family and close friends out of her home in 1969. Eventually, it became a community event.
By Janine Gateshttps://janineslittlehollywood.blogspot.com
Rodney O’Neill, 50, suffered a stroke on January 31, but says nothing could keep him and a whole lot of friends from pulling off the 47thannual Barb O’Neill’s Family and Friends Thanksgiving community meal. The event was held at First United Methodist Church on Wednesday.
“Without the community support and help of everybody, we would be sunk,” he said, crediting support from local nonprofits, the Washington Federation of State Employees Local 443 union, NW Realty and the Van Dorm family, and many more.
About his stroke that affected his right side, O’Neill said, “It happened so quickly -there were no warning signs.” O’Neill has worked hard to recover, and has progressed from using a wheelchair to walking with some difficulty. 
“It slowed me down but it definitely didn’t stop me. I have a purpose. I have been given the right tools to do what I do with knowledge, faith, and a genuine passion to want to help people….” he said, as well wishers and friends constantly caught his attention.
O’Neill estimated that about 150 volunteers turned out to assist with the meal, including a lot of high school students from Olympia High School and Timberline High School, who also provided musical entertainment.
Logistically, volunteers started planning on Tuesday at 8:00 a.m.
“Being prepared and working all day yesterday gave us an advantage,” he said. O’Neill was prepared to serve about 1,500 meals, but by 4:30 p.m., only about 550 meals were served. Each meal was deeply appreciated.
An evening dinner rush before 5:00 p.m. is typical, and volunteers were ready. Robert Johns, who has assisted with the Thanksgiving dinner for four years, wore a festive turkey hat as he stood behind the serving line, ready to replace empty serving food containers with hot, full ones. 
The total number of those served was down, perhaps due to the fact that the event was changed this year from United Churches in downtown Olympia to First United Methodist Church on Legion Way, in Olympia’s eastside neighborhood. 
The new location provides more room for folks to eat, sit, enjoy musical entertainment on a stage, and make new friends, or see old friends. O’Neill is confident people will find and get used to coming to the new location.
“It’s just amazing….Look, there’s no stress on their faces. They are happy to be here,” O'Neill said of the crowd. 
Not only were folks able to eat a traditional Thanksgiving meal with all the trimmings, a resource room was set up to provide information about local social services, and a clothing room provided clothes, blankets, coats, and paper bags filled with soups and soap. The YMCA provided free shower passes to those in need. 

Providing enough clothes and warm coats for men is a perpetual need and donations are accepted year round.
Describing how he had worked on the meals by his mother’s side since he was little, O'Neill said that taking over the event was not as easy as he first thought.
“In the last three years of her life, it was like I was in ‘Training Day.’ It was always so intense with everything she was trying to tell me, and I was like, ‘OK, Mom, I got it, I got it,’ but the whole time, I didn’t have it.”
But by the looks of how shifts of volunteers were kept busy and smoothly rotated between stations, and plentiful, hot food, drinks and desserts were served with smiles, with friendly conversation heard throughout the church’s Great Hall, it would seem Rodney O’Neill has got it.
O’Neill’s Family and Friends will have a Christmas meal on Saturday, December 17, from 12 – 6:00 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, and provide toys and gift baskets.

For more photos and stories about Barb O’Neill’s Family and Friends, go to https://janineslittlehollywood.blogspot.comand type key words into the search engine.

To donate food, gifts, gently used clothing, or supplies such as sleeping bags or coats, or to find out how you can get involved in this event or other community events sponsored by Barb O'Neill's Family and Friends, contact Rodney O'Neill at (360) 485-9931 or barbssoul@yahoo.com.

Art Without Borders Part One

South Sound Arts - Wed, 11/23/2016 - 3:45pm

 Photos of eL Seed’s graffiti art at MatterPublished in the Weekly Volcano, Nov. 23, 2016 “Vidigal Favela” graffiti art by eL Seed, photo courtesy Matter.Lisa Kinoshita, curator of moss + mineral at Matter, wrote: “The long-awaited eL Seed exhibit is up! After seeing this young French-Tunisian artist give a talk on TED, I was in hot pursuit to share his global initiative to share the message of peace through graffiti art. It's more urgent now than ever. eL Seed has given permission to show photographs of his work at Matter, with a portion of the proceeds going to support the work of Doctors Without Borders. This is part one of a three-part series called Art Without Borders.”The art of this world-renowned graffiti artist is essentially fine calligraphy writ large on the walls of buildings and other structures. It is a far cry from mere tagging.  Kinoshita wrote: “(eL Seed) has developed a signature form of art combining the fluid lines of Arabic calligraphy with the street dynamism of Western graffiti — in a style he calls, “calligraffti.” With stunning originality and vibrancy, eL Seed has created messages of peace on streets and buildings in the capitols of Europe, the U.S., the Middle East, and around the world. His artwork, which came to international attention after the birth of the Arab Spring in Tunisia, holds a universal call for peace and goodwill, as well as specific relevance for the places and cultures in which it appears.” In “Didouche Mourad”, located in Algeria, Arabic writing forms a circle on the side of a white building approximately five stories high (as I deduced by counting the windows in the photograph). A wall label explains that it is a line from an Algerian song: “How could I forget the land of good? How could my heart be in peace?”“Vidigal Favela” is writing in pink outlined in black on the roof of a building. It is nestled on the side of a mountain above a town on a calm bay. The photograph is taken from a vantage point even higher above showing the town, the bay and the surrounding mountains. The artist said of it, "At the top of the hill, I see this amazing rooftop — brand new, white. You never find a white rooftop. I started painting this poem from this writer from one of the favelas, Gabriela Torres Barbosa, I did my piece, took my picture and left." Later he found out the building was a new art school.Pont des Arts in Paris is a bridge built by Napoleon in 1802. Thousands of modern visitors have left padlocks as tokens of love. Recently the locks were removed because there were so many that they thought the bridge would inevitably fall into the Seine, and eL Seed was invited to paint the structure. He chose the words of Balzac: "Paris is in truth an ocean: you can plumb it but you'll never know its depths."  It would be nice if these and the other works shown at Matter could be seen on site, but we’re lucky to have the photos Also showing are photographs of works by Paris-based artist, Jean Faucheur, a seminal figure in the Paris street-art movement of the 1980s. He tagged in New York with Keith Haring and showed at the Tony Shafrazi Gallery. Today, he owns an art center in the Belleville section of Paris.

Art Without Borders Part One, noon to 6 p.m., by chance and by appointment through Dec. 15, Saturdays and by appointment; for appointment call Lisa Kinoshita 253.961.5220, Matter, 821 Pacific Ave., Tacoma, 253.879.3701. mattertacoma.com
Categories: Arts & Entertainment
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